7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

Believe it or not, conversational phraseology plays an important part in deciding if you are a good English speaker or not. And when it comes to conversation, if you don’t know the right phraseology to express your opinions in English, you may soon draw a blank at any point in your conversation.

A conversation usually consists of starter phrases, a little discussion, agreeing and disagreeing. And when it comes to disagreeing, repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’ over and again can make your conversation monotonous and boring. It is for this fact, I thought why not add some expressions which you can use instead of repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today’s article is a part of our “7 Power Expression Series” which will cover seven different ways you can show your disagreement while conversing.
So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


 

Idiomatic Expression

  • I beg to differ
  • Explanation: It is a polite way of disagreeing with someone else. It is hands-down the best phrase to use when it comes to formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I beg to differ with you, but I think we should complete our projects first and then plan the conference.
  • I am sorry sir, but I beg to differ from your opinion.

Idiomatic Expression

  • No way!
  • Explanation: It is a strong phrase that you should only use in informal situations. You can use it to show a strong disagreement about something that you think is impossible to happen.
  • Examples:
  • There is no way you are gonna win this match. He is a pro wrestler.
  • A: He will definitely top in his class this year.
    B: No way!

Idiomatic Expression

  • I don’t think so.
  • Explanation: You can use this to show your slight disagreement and when you think the said statement is untrue, but you are not completely sure.
  • Examples:
  • A: Such a serious issue should be handled by the government.
  • B: Well, I don’t think so. I think common people should take their stand for the cause.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I totally disagree with that point
  • Explanation: The above phrase is quite strong, so make sure you do not use it in formal situations. It is just a way to show strong disagreement with somebody’s opinion or point.
  • Examples:
  • I totally disagree with the idea of investing in a company that hardly has any investors.
  • A: I think the government should provide free shelter and food for everyone.
    B: I totally disagree with that point. It will affect our economy if we start giving everything for free.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not so sure about that.
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase to show your disagreement to a point when you not so sure about the other person’s statement.
  • Examples:
  • A: He could have done better if he has taken coaching from my institute.
    B: I am not so sure about that. He is hardly passionate about learning.
  • A: They would have won the match, had they included Ron in the match.
    B: I am not so sure about that.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Not necessarily
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase when you doubt if the statement is true.
  • Examples:
  • A: He is lying for sure.
    B: Not necessarily.
  • A: I think the results would have been different, had there been no rain yesterday.
    B: Not necessarily.

Idiomatic Expression

  • That’s not always the case.
  • Explanation: You can say this expression when you want to convey that the statement said by the other person might not be always true.
  • Examples:
  • A: I think people of my society are solely responsible for this entire problem.
    B: Well, that’s not always the case. Sometimes the management doesn’t take their responsibility seriously.

I hope these expressions will add value to your active vocabulary and improve your spoken English. Make sure you go through this article once again and learn them off by heart so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

Did you fall for someone or you were smitten by them?

Or was it just a crush?

Love is in the air these days, isn’t it?

And you must be having some quality time with your partners this week.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, I thought why not add an article to ‘The Seven Power Expression Series’ related to love and relationships.

Hey everyone out there,

How are you all doing today?

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let get down to the business and learn some phraseology related to attraction and love, so you never draw a blank in your conversation this Valentine:


Infographic Presentation

Love idioms


 

Idiomatic Expression

Fall for someone: To be attracted to someone and start loving them.
Examples:

  • I think he has fallen for Emma; he always tries to find ways to be around her.
  • We both met each other at a friend’s party and fell for each other.

Idiomatic Expression

Have the hots for someone: To have a romantic attraction towards someone.
Examples:

  • The way she looked at you at my birthday party, she definitely has the hots for him.
  • He has the hots for the young lady who joined yesterday.

    Idiomatic Expression

    Have a soft spot for someone: If you have a soft spot for someone, you like them a lot.
    Examples:

  • He definitely has a soft spot for Susan; he keeps looking at her.
  • Did you have a soft spot for Emma during high school time?

Idiomatic Expression

Smitten with: To be strongly drawn to somebody.
Examples:

  • She was smitten by him the moment she saw him at the bar.
  • Medha was smitten by Chris as she saw his football skills.

Idiomatic Expression

Love to death: Feel extremely strong affection for someone or love someone all your life.
Examples:

  • The lady loved her husband to death. Even when he left him, she kept his belongings as a memory.
  • John loves Emma to death. He just can’t imagine a single day without her.

Idiomatic Expression

Have a crush on: to have romantic feelings for someone.
Examples:

  • I think Ron has a crush on Emma. He always keeps on talking about her.
  • Do you have a crush on any Hollywood celebrity?

Idiomatic Expression

Have eyes only for: To be romantically interested or loyal to one individual.
Examples:

  • Jane always has eyes only for Robert; she has never dated any other man.
  • Though he may not be expressive, he only has eyes for you.

Well, that’s it for today and I hope you would have enjoyed going through this lovely chapter. Make sure you learn all these idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through these expressions once again, so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then buy some gifts for your partner, enjoy your Valentine’s Day, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

Life is fair because it is unfair to all, isn’t it?

I guess you seem to agree with me on that point.

And when it comes to agreeing with someone, saying ‘I agree’ over and again can make your conversation boring and monotonous.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I am sure you would have got the idea till now what this chapter is all about.

Well, in case you don’t, today we will learn about 7 different ways how you can show your agreement with the other person without using the usual phrase over and again ‘I agree’. So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:

7 ways to say ‘I  agree’ in English

Infographic Presentation

Expression 1
Absolutely
  • Explanation: You can use this when you agree with the other person with no qualification, restriction, or limitation.
    Example:
  • John: He failed because he has not read even a single chapter.
  • Ben: Absolutely!
Expression 2
You can say that again
  • Explanation: It is used when you agree with the other person’s statement so much that you are willing to hear that again. It’s just a way to show how strongly you believe whatever the person has said to you.
    Example:
  • Susan: I think we should take a break now. We have been working for the whole day.
  • Ben: You can say that again.
Expression 3
That’s so true.
  • Explanation: You can use this when you think the other person’s statements are up to the point and are totally correct.
    Example:
  • A: It’s worthless if he tries to invest more in such a failing project.
  • B: That’s so true.
Expression 4
Tell me about it! 
  • Explanation: You can use this when you want to say that you feel the same way or have had the same experience in the past. It is a bit informal so make sure you better don’t use it in formal situations.
    Examples:
  • A: His boring sad songs irritate me so much.
  • B: Tell me about it!
  • A: This exercise is so exhausting.
  • B: Tell me about it!
Expression 5
I suppose/guess so.
  • Explanation: There are certain situations where you will agree but weakly. It is this situation where this phrase ‘I suppose so’ comes in handy. You can use this phrase for weak agreements where you agree, but reluctantly.
    Examples:
  • A: He will get through his examination this time.
  • B: I suppose so.
Expression 6
I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • Explanation: It’s an expression to show how strongly you agree with the other person’s statement. Many a time, non-natives misunderstand the meaning of this expression as disagreement because of the use of the word ‘not’. It simply means that you completely agree with the statement.
    Example:
  • A: The boss should at least give us a break this weekend.
  • B: I couldn’t agree with you more.
Expression 7
You have a point there.
  • Explanation: You can use this when the person in front is explaining you something and says a statement that you completely agree with.
    Example:
  • A: Had they included their main players in the match, they would have won it.
  • B: You have a point there.

I think the information presented in this article is easy to learn, isn’t it?

What would you say?

I couldn’t agree with you more.
Or
That’s so true.

Or something else?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions with the use of any of the above expressions.

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say ‘I like it’ in English

Do you like football?

Yeah, I like it.

What about acting?

I like that too.

Do you like cricket?

Yeah, I like it.

Hey everyone out there,
Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well, it sometimes becomes so boring when you have to use a single expression or phrase over and again; moreover, it kind of turns off the person in front to continue any further conversation. And I just don’t wanna see you in any of such situations. So I was busy developing this series of chapters which covers different ways to say something so that your conversation never becomes so boring and meaningless and you can always have an edge on others while you chat.

I was confused if how many expressions should I include in a single chapter because some people get confused when you throw them loads of information at once, so I considered an average number seven which was neither less now more to learn, hence came the name – The Seven Power Expression Series, which would cover seven different ways you can get across your message to the person in front.

And I know my readers are wise enough to get what I am about to cover in this chapter, can you guess?

Yeah, you are dead right.

Today we will cover seven expressions you can use instead of the phrase ‘I like it’.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Presentation

Idiomatic Expression


 

Idiomatic Expression

It grew on me: It grew on me means that you didn’t like something when you first encountered it, but over time, you learned to like it.

Explanation: There are certain things which you don’t like at the first time, but when you keep doing it or using it, you start to like it. Let’s say your friend has a video game which he really likes, so he lends it to you for checking it out. And when you first play it, you don’t like it, but after playing for a while or some days, you start enjoying it. It is this situation when this idiomatic expression comes in handy and you can say something like this: “It grew on me.”

Example: The music CD you gave me last weekend grew on me.

Idiomatic Expression

I am fond of it: It means you have liked something for a long time or may have an emotional attachment to it.

Explanation: Use this when you wanna put weight on how much liking you have for a certain thing or a person.

Example: John is fond of his sports bike; he just can’t live even for a day without it.

Idiomatic Expression

It’s to my liking – It is a formal way of saying ‘I like it’.

Explanation: There are situations like a business meeting or applications where things are more formal and it is always a better option to go with formal vocabulary. Although using the phrase ‘I like it’ in formal situations is not at all wrong, but the above phrase fits better in the particular situation.

Example: Conferences every weekend is to my liking. It helps us bring up new ideas for upcoming projects.

Idiomatic Expression

I am addicted to it: It means when you like something so much that you can’t live even a day without it.

Explanation: We often use it for negative situations, but it’s not necessary that it has always to be used for negatives only. You can even get addicted to a music that you really like or be it any activity like exercising.

Example: I am addicted to rock concerts.

Idiomatic Expression

I am crazy about: It means you really follow and love something inside out.

Explanation: The expression changes from ‘I am crazy about’ to ‘I am mad about’, or ‘I am passionate about’ depending on person to person but they all mean the same. They all show your love and liking for a particular thing or a person.

Example: Emma is crazy about Hollywood movies.

Idiomatic Expression

It is an acquired taste: It means something that most of the people don’t like at first, but with time, they start to develop a liking for it.

Explanation: It is almost similar to ‘It has grown on me’, and people even get confused between their usages. But I have seen many examples and found out that ‘it is an acquired taste’ is used for a thing that not many people like at first, but they develop a liking for it with time. On the other hand, ‘it grew on me’ is used for something that you didn’t like at first but developed a liking with time.

Example: Beer is an acquired taste for him. He didn’t like it at first, but now he enjoys it.

Idiomatic Expression

It appeals to me: It is often used for ideas that you really like, though you can it other situations as well, depending on whether it fits there or not.

Example: Wearing black leather jackets on white T-shirt appeals to me.

Did you like today’s article?
Or
Are you addicted to this blog?
Or
Has it grown on you?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views with the use of any of the above expressions or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.