7 ways to “Avoid answering the Questions”

How is personal life going?

Where are you planning to go this weekend?

What amount of money did you make last year?

Well… don’t worry, I am not asking you any of the personal or sensitive questions like a few above.

But I can tell you for sure you will be in situations somewhere down the line where you will want to avoid answering questions which are personal or may be sensitive.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I hope you have enough grasp of the idea what we are going to learn in today’s blog. You know what it is?

Yes, you are right.

Today we will learn about 7 different phrases you can use to avoid answering questions.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation

7 ways to avoid answering a question

 


7 ways to avoid answering a question


1: Can we talk about something else?

Explanation: I would rather use it in an informal situation such as friends, girlfriend or someone you are really close to. This expression in itself conveys to change the topic of discussion, so you expect the listener to be wise enough to understand and stop talking about the present topic or question as it might be hurting you or you might be hesitant talking about it.

Example:
A: So how long have you been together? I still can’t believe you both are breaking up.
B: Can we talk about something else?

2: It’s none of your business.

Explanation: You may use it in situations when the person is continuously bothering you by asking questions about your life that you are not comfortable to reveal. It is quite rude, so I would suggest you never use it in formal situations.

Example:
A: How much did you make last month from your investments?
B: It’s none of your business.

3: No comment!

Explanation: You would have surely heard this phrase being used by celebrities in TV interviews and press conferences many a time. It is simply a way to avoid answering in public as it can cause a controversy. People also use this when you can say something critical or negative, but you don’t wanna say it directly.

Example:
A: What’s your opinion about the present government?
B: No comment!

4: Sorry, but that’s personal.

Explanation: It’s a self-explanatory phrase which I think needs no explanation for its meaning. Using this you directly convey the one who is asking the question that you are not comfortable revealing the personal things to them.

Example:
A: What did happen yesterday? You seemed quite upset at the party.
B: Sorry, but that’s personal. By the way, everything is good now.

5: Let’s wait and see.

Explanation: You can use this when you want the other person to wait and see the answer personally rather than asking for your answer to the question.

Example:
John: Are you coming to his birthday party tonight?
Michelle: Let’s wait and see.

6: Sorry, but that’s confidential.

Explanation: There are certain business situations where you don’t have the permission to reveal the information to someone else. It is that situation where you can use this phrase to avoid answering their question.

Example:
A: Can you tell me with who is your team partnering in this contract?
B: I am sorry, but that’s confidential.

7: I am not at liberty to say anything.

Explanation: It has the same meaning as the above phrase. It is a polite way of not answering the question when you don’t have the freedom or authority to give out any information.

Example:
Will: How much are you thinking of investing in this project?
John: Sorry Will, but I am not at liberty to say anything.

 

How many of them do you use while speaking?

One?

Two?

Or more?

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Hurrah! We learned seven different phrases to avoid answering a question, so at least you won’t be avoiding regular boring phrases like “I don’t wanna tell” or anything else.

Please go through this article once again and learn all the idiomatic expressions off by heart so it becomes a part of your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 Most Common ‘TIME’ Collocations you should know

7 Most Common ‘TIME’ Collocations you should know

How is your time going these days?

Well, in case if things are not going that good, maybe you should take a timeout for some days and chill out with your friends.

Almost every single person has taken it to account when it came to revealing their secret juice of success. With that being said, I guess you now have a good grasp of knowledge what we are about to dive into.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today we will learn about seven different ‘TIME’ collocations you should know and start using to improve your spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business and use our ‘TIME’ learning some useful time collocations:


INFOGRAPHIC REPRESENTATION

Time Collocation


Collocation- About time

Meaning:  In short it means ‘finally’. It is often used for something happening now that should have been done or happened earlier.
Example: It’s about time he decided he should buy a new bike and sell the old one.

Collocation- Make time for

Meaning: It means to create time from your busy schedule of work.
Example: I need to make time this weekend for taking my kid to play.

Collocation- Go through a rough time

Meaning: To experience a lot of problems in a period of your life.
Example: Sara has been going through some tough time after her break up with Harry.

Collocation- Stall for time

Meaning- To delay or procrastinate something for later.
Example: The students were trying to stall for time so they don’t have to give any test.

Collocation- Kill time

Meaning- To do something that keeps you busy while you are waiting for something else to happen.
Example: I killed time reading the magazines while waiting for the flights at the airport.

Collocation- Spend time

Meaning- To pass time doing some activity.
Example: He is spending time surfing the web these days.

Collocation- On time

Meaning: neither early nor late, at the right time.
Example: Though there was so much traffic in the way, we managed to reach the place on time.

How many of them did you know?

One?

Three?

Or More?

I hope you would have found this article useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all collocations off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

 

7 Color Idioms you may not be knowing

7 Color Idioms you may not be knowing

Life would have been so dull and boring, had there been no colors around.

Isn’t it?

Each color has its own significance and this kind of gave a vibe, why not write about colors if they are so important in our lives.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

In today’s article of ‘7 Power Expression Series’, we will learn about color expressions that you will hear being used by natives in TV series or movies.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business and learn seven different color expressions you should know from now on:



Idiomatic Expression

  • Out of the blue
  • Explanation: To appear or happen without warning, unexpectedly.
  • Examples:
  • He came to my friend’s party out of the blue.
  • The mob came from out of the blue and started beating people on the road.

Idiomatic Expression

  • In the black
  • Explanation: If a company or person is in the black, it means they are earning some good amount of profit, or the amount of money earned is more than the money spent.
  • Examples:
  • The company is in the black since the new staff has joined in the office.
  • Our team is in the black due to our consistent hard work and dedication.

Idiomatic Expression

  • To be green
  • Explanation: Used to describe someone who is immature, or inexperienced
  • Examples:
  • You can’t expect any fast promotion if you are green in this job.
  • He is too green to be selected for the international level.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Feel blue
  • Explanation: To feel depressed or sad.
  • Examples:
  • Emma was feeling blue because she lost her pet in an accident.
  • He has been feeling blue after he fought with his girlfriend.

Idiomatic Expression

  • A white elephant
  • Explanation: a possession that is useless, especially one that is expensive to maintain or difficult to dispose of.
  • Examples:
  • This golf kit is a white elephant for me. There are no golf courts in my town.
  • My mom gifted me a CD player on my birthday, but it is a white elephant for me. I hardly have any CD, moreover, I don’t have any interest in watching movies now.

Idiomatic Expression

  • A golden opportunity
  • Explanation: An opportunity that may never present itself again.
  • Examples:
  • He was given a golden opportunity to sing with the best pop singer of our country at a live concert.
  • Ron should not miss such a golden opportunity to play at international level.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Blue blood
  • Explanation: It is used to describe someone who is born in a royal and wealthy family.
  • Examples:
  • All the blue blood were invited to the royal wedding.
  • He is a blue blood. He owns two palaces in the main town and twenty-five luxury cars.

How many of the above idioms did you know?

Were these color idioms interesting?

I think they were.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

I hope you would have found this useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 ways to say “I dislike it” in English

7 ways to say ‘I dislike it’ in English

Do you like classic movies or songs?

Well, in case if you do, you now know how you can show your liking in seven different ways which I explained in this article- 7 ways to say ‘I like it’.

But if you are on the opposite side, I mean, if you don’t like classic movies or songs, you would often use only one phrase I don’t like it’ or ‘I dislike it’.

And I don’t think it’s fair to those who want to show their dislike for something.

After all everyone should have equal options to convey their feelings in different ways. It is, for this reason, I thought why not cover seven different ways to show your dislike.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

And today we will learn seven different ways to show your dislike for someone or something. So without further ado, let get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


Idiomatic Expression

  • It isn’t my thing
  • Explanation: When someone says it isn’t their thing, it means that it is something that they don’t enjoy or interests them.
  • Examples:
  • Soccer isn’t his thing. He is hardly passionate about the game.
  • A: Do wanna take part in this dance competition?
    B: Dance isn’t my thing.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not very fond of it
  • Explanation: It simply means that you don’t like it that much how most people do.
  • Examples:
  • I am not very fond of strawberries.
  • Emma is not very fond of candlelight dinners. She likes long rides.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not a fan of
  • Explanation: You can say that you are not a fan of something when you don’t like something much or dislike it.
  • Examples:
  • He is not a fan of classical music.
  • A: Do you wanna come along at today’s concert?
    B: I am not a big fan of this pop singer.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not into it
  • Explanation: When you are not into something, it means that you don’t like it.
  • Examples:
  • She is definitely not into you. You should stop trying hit on her now.
  • I am not into golf.

Idiomatic Expression

  • It isn’t my cup of tea
  • Explanation: It means that you don’t like it or you are not interested in it.
  • Examples:
  • Sand art isn’t my cup of tea.
  • A: Are you taking part in this race competition?
    B: It’s not a cup of my tea.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I detest doing it
  • Explanation: You should only use it when you hate doing something. It is a strong phrase, so you should be cautious while using it. I would rather advise you all not to use it in formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I detest seeing him dance. He can’t even do a step properly and everybody calls him a dancer.
  • I detest when people come in without knocking the door.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I can’t stand
  • Explanation: You can use it when you dislike someone or something to an extent that you are unable to put up with it.
  • Examples:
  • I just can’t stand seeing Ron around me. He is such a show-off.
  • Robert can’t stand classical music at all.

How many of them did you already know?

One?

Two?

Or more?

I hope you would have found this useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all expressions off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

Believe it or not, conversational phraseology plays an important part in deciding if you are a good English speaker or not. And when it comes to conversation, if you don’t know the right phraseology to express your opinions in English, you may soon draw a blank at any point in your conversation.

A conversation usually consists of starter phrases, a little discussion, agreeing and disagreeing. And when it comes to disagreeing, repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’ over and again can make your conversation monotonous and boring. It is for this fact, I thought why not add some expressions which you can use instead of repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today’s article is a part of our “7 Power Expression Series” which will cover seven different ways you can show your disagreement while conversing.
So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


 

Idiomatic Expression

  • I beg to differ
  • Explanation: It is a polite way of disagreeing with someone else. It is hands-down the best phrase to use when it comes to formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I beg to differ with you, but I think we should complete our projects first and then plan the conference.
  • I am sorry sir, but I beg to differ from your opinion.

Idiomatic Expression

  • No way!
  • Explanation: It is a strong phrase that you should only use in informal situations. You can use it to show a strong disagreement about something that you think is impossible to happen.
  • Examples:
  • There is no way you are gonna win this match. He is a pro wrestler.
  • A: He will definitely top in his class this year.
    B: No way!

Idiomatic Expression

  • I don’t think so.
  • Explanation: You can use this to show your slight disagreement and when you think the said statement is untrue, but you are not completely sure.
  • Examples:
  • A: Such a serious issue should be handled by the government.
  • B: Well, I don’t think so. I think common people should take their stand for the cause.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I totally disagree with that point
  • Explanation: The above phrase is quite strong, so make sure you do not use it in formal situations. It is just a way to show strong disagreement with somebody’s opinion or point.
  • Examples:
  • I totally disagree with the idea of investing in a company that hardly has any investors.
  • A: I think the government should provide free shelter and food for everyone.
    B: I totally disagree with that point. It will affect our economy if we start giving everything for free.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not so sure about that.
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase to show your disagreement to a point when you not so sure about the other person’s statement.
  • Examples:
  • A: He could have done better if he has taken coaching from my institute.
    B: I am not so sure about that. He is hardly passionate about learning.
  • A: They would have won the match, had they included Ron in the match.
    B: I am not so sure about that.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Not necessarily
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase when you doubt if the statement is true.
  • Examples:
  • A: He is lying for sure.
    B: Not necessarily.
  • A: I think the results would have been different, had there been no rain yesterday.
    B: Not necessarily.

Idiomatic Expression

  • That’s not always the case.
  • Explanation: You can say this expression when you want to convey that the statement said by the other person might not be always true.
  • Examples:
  • A: I think people of my society are solely responsible for this entire problem.
    B: Well, that’s not always the case. Sometimes the management doesn’t take their responsibility seriously.

I hope these expressions will add value to your active vocabulary and improve your spoken English. Make sure you go through this article once again and learn them off by heart so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

Did you fall for someone or you were smitten by them?

Or was it just a crush?

Love is in the air these days, isn’t it?

And you must be having some quality time with your partners this week.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, I thought why not add an article to ‘The Seven Power Expression Series’ related to love and relationships.

Hey everyone out there,

How are you all doing today?

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let get down to the business and learn some phraseology related to attraction and love, so you never draw a blank in your conversation this Valentine:


Infographic Presentation

Love idioms


 

Idiomatic Expression

Fall for someone: To be attracted to someone and start loving them.
Examples:

  • I think he has fallen for Emma; he always tries to find ways to be around her.
  • We both met each other at a friend’s party and fell for each other.

Idiomatic Expression

Have the hots for someone: To have a romantic attraction towards someone.
Examples:

  • The way she looked at you at my birthday party, she definitely has the hots for him.
  • He has the hots for the young lady who joined yesterday.

    Idiomatic Expression

    Have a soft spot for someone: If you have a soft spot for someone, you like them a lot.
    Examples:

  • He definitely has a soft spot for Susan; he keeps looking at her.
  • Did you have a soft spot for Emma during high school time?

Idiomatic Expression

Smitten with: To be strongly drawn to somebody.
Examples:

  • She was smitten by him the moment she saw him at the bar.
  • Medha was smitten by Chris as she saw his football skills.

Idiomatic Expression

Love to death: Feel extremely strong affection for someone or love someone all your life.
Examples:

  • The lady loved her husband to death. Even when he left him, she kept his belongings as a memory.
  • John loves Emma to death. He just can’t imagine a single day without her.

Idiomatic Expression

Have a crush on: to have romantic feelings for someone.
Examples:

  • I think Ron has a crush on Emma. He always keeps on talking about her.
  • Do you have a crush on any Hollywood celebrity?

Idiomatic Expression

Have eyes only for: To be romantically interested or loyal to one individual.
Examples:

  • Jane always has eyes only for Robert; she has never dated any other man.
  • Though he may not be expressive, he only has eyes for you.

Well, that’s it for today and I hope you would have enjoyed going through this lovely chapter. Make sure you learn all these idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through these expressions once again, so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then buy some gifts for your partner, enjoy your Valentine’s Day, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

Life is fair because it is unfair to all, isn’t it?

I guess you seem to agree with me on that point.

And when it comes to agreeing with someone, saying ‘I agree’ over and again can make your conversation boring and monotonous.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I am sure you would have got the idea till now what this chapter is all about.

Well, in case you don’t, today we will learn about 7 different ways how you can show your agreement with the other person without using the usual phrase over and again ‘I agree’. So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:

7 ways to say ‘I  agree’ in English

Infographic Presentation

Expression 1
Absolutely
  • Explanation: You can use this when you agree with the other person with no qualification, restriction, or limitation.
    Example:
  • John: He failed because he has not read even a single chapter.
  • Ben: Absolutely!
Expression 2
You can say that again
  • Explanation: It is used when you agree with the other person’s statement so much that you are willing to hear that again. It’s just a way to show how strongly you believe whatever the person has said to you.
    Example:
  • Susan: I think we should take a break now. We have been working for the whole day.
  • Ben: You can say that again.
Expression 3
That’s so true.
  • Explanation: You can use this when you think the other person’s statements are up to the point and are totally correct.
    Example:
  • A: It’s worthless if he tries to invest more in such a failing project.
  • B: That’s so true.
Expression 4
Tell me about it! 
  • Explanation: You can use this when you want to say that you feel the same way or have had the same experience in the past. It is a bit informal so make sure you better don’t use it in formal situations.
    Examples:
  • A: His boring sad songs irritate me so much.
  • B: Tell me about it!
  • A: This exercise is so exhausting.
  • B: Tell me about it!
Expression 5
I suppose/guess so.
  • Explanation: There are certain situations where you will agree but weakly. It is this situation where this phrase ‘I suppose so’ comes in handy. You can use this phrase for weak agreements where you agree, but reluctantly.
    Examples:
  • A: He will get through his examination this time.
  • B: I suppose so.
Expression 6
I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • Explanation: It’s an expression to show how strongly you agree with the other person’s statement. Many a time, non-natives misunderstand the meaning of this expression as disagreement because of the use of the word ‘not’. It simply means that you completely agree with the statement.
    Example:
  • A: The boss should at least give us a break this weekend.
  • B: I couldn’t agree with you more.
Expression 7
You have a point there.
  • Explanation: You can use this when the person in front is explaining you something and says a statement that you completely agree with.
    Example:
  • A: Had they included their main players in the match, they would have won it.
  • B: You have a point there.

I think the information presented in this article is easy to learn, isn’t it?

What would you say?

I couldn’t agree with you more.
Or
That’s so true.

Or something else?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions with the use of any of the above expressions.

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say ‘I like it’ in English

Do you like football?

Yeah, I like it.

What about acting?

I like that too.

Do you like cricket?

Yeah, I like it.

Hey everyone out there,
Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well, it sometimes becomes so boring when you have to use a single expression or phrase over and again; moreover, it kind of turns off the person in front to continue any further conversation. And I just don’t wanna see you in any of such situations. So I was busy developing this series of chapters which covers different ways to say something so that your conversation never becomes so boring and meaningless and you can always have an edge on others while you chat.

I was confused if how many expressions should I include in a single chapter because some people get confused when you throw them loads of information at once, so I considered an average number seven which was neither less now more to learn, hence came the name – The Seven Power Expression Series, which would cover seven different ways you can get across your message to the person in front.

And I know my readers are wise enough to get what I am about to cover in this chapter, can you guess?

Yeah, you are dead right.

Today we will cover seven expressions you can use instead of the phrase ‘I like it’.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Presentation


 

Idiomatic Expression

It grew on me: It grew on me means that you didn’t like something when you first encountered it, but over time, you learned to like it.

Explanation: There are certain things which you don’t like at the first time, but when you keep doing it or using it, you start to like it. Let’s say your friend has a video game which he really likes, so he lends it to you for checking it out. And when you first play it, you don’t like it, but after playing for a while or some days, you start enjoying it. It is this situation when this idiomatic expression comes in handy and you can say something like this: “It grew on me.”

Example: The music CD you gave me last weekend grew on me.

Idiomatic Expression

I am fond of it: It means you have liked something for a long time or may have an emotional attachment to it.

Explanation: Use this when you wanna put weight on how much liking you have for a certain thing or a person.

Example: John is fond of his sports bike; he just can’t live even for a day without it.

Idiomatic Expression

It’s to my liking – It is a formal way of saying ‘I like it’.

Explanation: There are situations like a business meeting or applications where things are more formal and it is always a better option to go with formal vocabulary. Although using the phrase ‘I like it’ in formal situations is not at all wrong, but the above phrase fits better in the particular situation.

Example: Conferences every weekend is to my liking. It helps us bring up new ideas for upcoming projects.

Idiomatic Expression

I am addicted to it: It means when you like something so much that you can’t live even a day without it.

Explanation: We often use it for negative situations, but it’s not necessary that it has always to be used for negatives only. You can even get addicted to a music that you really like or be it any activity like exercising.

Example: I am addicted to rock concerts.

Idiomatic Expression

I am crazy about: It means you really follow and love something inside out.

Explanation: The expression changes from ‘I am crazy about’ to ‘I am mad about’, or ‘I am passionate about’ depending on person to person but they all mean the same. They all show your love and liking for a particular thing or a person.

Example: Emma is crazy about Hollywood movies.

Idiomatic Expression

It is an acquired taste: It means something that most of the people don’t like at first, but with time, they start to develop a liking for it.

Explanation: It is almost similar to ‘It has grown on me’, and people even get confused between their usages. But I have seen many examples and found out that ‘it is an acquired taste’ is used for a thing that not many people like at first, but they develop a liking for it with time. On the other hand, ‘it grew on me’ is used for something that you didn’t like at first but developed a liking with time.

Example: Beer is an acquired taste for him. He didn’t like it at first, but now he enjoys it.

Idiomatic Expression

It appeals to me: It is often used for ideas that you really like, though you can it other situations as well, depending on whether it fits there or not.

Example: Wearing black leather jackets on white T-shirt appeals to me.

Did you like today’s article?
Or
Are you addicted to this blog?
Or
Has it grown on you?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views with the use of any of the above expressions or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

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