7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

Believe it or not, conversational phraseology plays an important part in deciding if you are a good English speaker or not. And when it comes to conversation, if you don’t know the right phraseology to express your opinions in English, you may soon draw a blank at any point in your conversation.

A conversation usually consists of starter phrases, a little discussion, agreeing and disagreeing. And when it comes to disagreeing, repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’ over and again can make your conversation monotonous and boring. It is for this fact, I thought why not add some expressions which you can use instead of repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today’s article is a part of our “7 Power Expression Series” which will cover seven different ways you can show your disagreement while conversing.
So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


 

Idiomatic Expression

  • I beg to differ
  • Explanation: It is a polite way of disagreeing with someone else. It is hands-down the best phrase to use when it comes to formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I beg to differ with you, but I think we should complete our projects first and then plan the conference.
  • I am sorry sir, but I beg to differ from your opinion.

Idiomatic Expression

  • No way!
  • Explanation: It is a strong phrase that you should only use in informal situations. You can use it to show a strong disagreement about something that you think is impossible to happen.
  • Examples:
  • There is no way you are gonna win this match. He is a pro wrestler.
  • A: He will definitely top in his class this year.
    B: No way!

Idiomatic Expression

  • I don’t think so.
  • Explanation: You can use this to show your slight disagreement and when you think the said statement is untrue, but you are not completely sure.
  • Examples:
  • A: Such a serious issue should be handled by the government.
  • B: Well, I don’t think so. I think common people should take their stand for the cause.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I totally disagree with that point
  • Explanation: The above phrase is quite strong, so make sure you do not use it in formal situations. It is just a way to show strong disagreement with somebody’s opinion or point.
  • Examples:
  • I totally disagree with the idea of investing in a company that hardly has any investors.
  • A: I think the government should provide free shelter and food for everyone.
    B: I totally disagree with that point. It will affect our economy if we start giving everything for free.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not so sure about that.
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase to show your disagreement to a point when you not so sure about the other person’s statement.
  • Examples:
  • A: He could have done better if he has taken coaching from my institute.
    B: I am not so sure about that. He is hardly passionate about learning.
  • A: They would have won the match, had they included Ron in the match.
    B: I am not so sure about that.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Not necessarily
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase when you doubt if the statement is true.
  • Examples:
  • A: He is lying for sure.
    B: Not necessarily.
  • A: I think the results would have been different, had there been no rain yesterday.
    B: Not necessarily.

Idiomatic Expression

  • That’s not always the case.
  • Explanation: You can say this expression when you want to convey that the statement said by the other person might not be always true.
  • Examples:
  • A: I think people of my society are solely responsible for this entire problem.
    B: Well, that’s not always the case. Sometimes the management doesn’t take their responsibility seriously.

I hope these expressions will add value to your active vocabulary and improve your spoken English. Make sure you go through this article once again and learn them off by heart so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

Did you fall for someone or you were smitten by them?

Or was it just a crush?

Love is in the air these days, isn’t it?

And you must be having some quality time with your partners this week.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, I thought why not add an article to ‘The Seven Power Expression Series’ related to love and relationships.

Hey everyone out there,

How are you all doing today?

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let get down to the business and learn some phraseology related to attraction and love, so you never draw a blank in your conversation this Valentine:


Infographic Presentation

Love idioms


 

Idiomatic Expression

Fall for someone: To be attracted to someone and start loving them.
Examples:

  • I think he has fallen for Emma; he always tries to find ways to be around her.
  • We both met each other at a friend’s party and fell for each other.

Idiomatic Expression

Have the hots for someone: To have a romantic attraction towards someone.
Examples:

  • The way she looked at you at my birthday party, she definitely has the hots for him.
  • He has the hots for the young lady who joined yesterday.

    Idiomatic Expression

    Have a soft spot for someone: If you have a soft spot for someone, you like them a lot.
    Examples:

  • He definitely has a soft spot for Susan; he keeps looking at her.
  • Did you have a soft spot for Emma during high school time?

Idiomatic Expression

Smitten with: To be strongly drawn to somebody.
Examples:

  • She was smitten by him the moment she saw him at the bar.
  • Medha was smitten by Chris as she saw his football skills.

Idiomatic Expression

Love to death: Feel extremely strong affection for someone or love someone all your life.
Examples:

  • The lady loved her husband to death. Even when he left him, she kept his belongings as a memory.
  • John loves Emma to death. He just can’t imagine a single day without her.

Idiomatic Expression

Have a crush on: to have romantic feelings for someone.
Examples:

  • I think Ron has a crush on Emma. He always keeps on talking about her.
  • Do you have a crush on any Hollywood celebrity?

Idiomatic Expression

Have eyes only for: To be romantically interested or loyal to one individual.
Examples:

  • Jane always has eyes only for Robert; she has never dated any other man.
  • Though he may not be expressive, he only has eyes for you.

Well, that’s it for today and I hope you would have enjoyed going through this lovely chapter. Make sure you learn all these idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through these expressions once again, so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then buy some gifts for your partner, enjoy your Valentine’s Day, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

Life is fair because it is unfair to all, isn’t it?

I guess you seem to agree with me on that point.

And when it comes to agreeing with someone, saying ‘I agree’ over and again can make your conversation boring and monotonous.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I am sure you would have got the idea till now what this chapter is all about.

Well, in case you don’t, today we will learn about 7 different ways how you can show your agreement with the other person without using the usual phrase over and again ‘I agree’. So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:

7 ways to say ‘I  agree’ in English

Infographic Presentation

Expression 1
Absolutely
  • Explanation: You can use this when you agree with the other person with no qualification, restriction, or limitation.
    Example:
  • John: He failed because he has not read even a single chapter.
  • Ben: Absolutely!
Expression 2
You can say that again
  • Explanation: It is used when you agree with the other person’s statement so much that you are willing to hear that again. It’s just a way to show how strongly you believe whatever the person has said to you.
    Example:
  • Susan: I think we should take a break now. We have been working for the whole day.
  • Ben: You can say that again.
Expression 3
That’s so true.
  • Explanation: You can use this when you think the other person’s statements are up to the point and are totally correct.
    Example:
  • A: It’s worthless if he tries to invest more in such a failing project.
  • B: That’s so true.
Expression 4
Tell me about it! 
  • Explanation: You can use this when you want to say that you feel the same way or have had the same experience in the past. It is a bit informal so make sure you better don’t use it in formal situations.
    Examples:
  • A: His boring sad songs irritate me so much.
  • B: Tell me about it!
  • A: This exercise is so exhausting.
  • B: Tell me about it!
Expression 5
I suppose/guess so.
  • Explanation: There are certain situations where you will agree but weakly. It is this situation where this phrase ‘I suppose so’ comes in handy. You can use this phrase for weak agreements where you agree, but reluctantly.
    Examples:
  • A: He will get through his examination this time.
  • B: I suppose so.
Expression 6
I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • Explanation: It’s an expression to show how strongly you agree with the other person’s statement. Many a time, non-natives misunderstand the meaning of this expression as disagreement because of the use of the word ‘not’. It simply means that you completely agree with the statement.
    Example:
  • A: The boss should at least give us a break this weekend.
  • B: I couldn’t agree with you more.
Expression 7
You have a point there.
  • Explanation: You can use this when the person in front is explaining you something and says a statement that you completely agree with.
    Example:
  • A: Had they included their main players in the match, they would have won it.
  • B: You have a point there.

I think the information presented in this article is easy to learn, isn’t it?

What would you say?

I couldn’t agree with you more.
Or
That’s so true.

Or something else?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions with the use of any of the above expressions.

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say ‘I like it’ in English

Do you like football?

Yeah, I like it.

What about acting?

I like that too.

Do you like cricket?

Yeah, I like it.

Hey everyone out there,
Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well, it sometimes becomes so boring when you have to use a single expression or phrase over and again; moreover, it kind of turns off the person in front to continue any further conversation. And I just don’t wanna see you in any of such situations. So I was busy developing this series of chapters which covers different ways to say something so that your conversation never becomes so boring and meaningless and you can always have an edge on others while you chat.

I was confused if how many expressions should I include in a single chapter because some people get confused when you throw them loads of information at once, so I considered an average number seven which was neither less now more to learn, hence came the name – The Seven Power Expression Series, which would cover seven different ways you can get across your message to the person in front.

And I know my readers are wise enough to get what I am about to cover in this chapter, can you guess?

Yeah, you are dead right.

Today we will cover seven expressions you can use instead of the phrase ‘I like it’.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Presentation

Idiomatic Expression


 

Idiomatic Expression

It grew on me: It grew on me means that you didn’t like something when you first encountered it, but over time, you learned to like it.

Explanation: There are certain things which you don’t like at the first time, but when you keep doing it or using it, you start to like it. Let’s say your friend has a video game which he really likes, so he lends it to you for checking it out. And when you first play it, you don’t like it, but after playing for a while or some days, you start enjoying it. It is this situation when this idiomatic expression comes in handy and you can say something like this: “It grew on me.”

Example: The music CD you gave me last weekend grew on me.

Idiomatic Expression

I am fond of it: It means you have liked something for a long time or may have an emotional attachment to it.

Explanation: Use this when you wanna put weight on how much liking you have for a certain thing or a person.

Example: John is fond of his sports bike; he just can’t live even for a day without it.

Idiomatic Expression

It’s to my liking – It is a formal way of saying ‘I like it’.

Explanation: There are situations like a business meeting or applications where things are more formal and it is always a better option to go with formal vocabulary. Although using the phrase ‘I like it’ in formal situations is not at all wrong, but the above phrase fits better in the particular situation.

Example: Conferences every weekend is to my liking. It helps us bring up new ideas for upcoming projects.

Idiomatic Expression

I am addicted to it: It means when you like something so much that you can’t live even a day without it.

Explanation: We often use it for negative situations, but it’s not necessary that it has always to be used for negatives only. You can even get addicted to a music that you really like or be it any activity like exercising.

Example: I am addicted to rock concerts.

Idiomatic Expression

I am crazy about: It means you really follow and love something inside out.

Explanation: The expression changes from ‘I am crazy about’ to ‘I am mad about’, or ‘I am passionate about’ depending on person to person but they all mean the same. They all show your love and liking for a particular thing or a person.

Example: Emma is crazy about Hollywood movies.

Idiomatic Expression

It is an acquired taste: It means something that most of the people don’t like at first, but with time, they start to develop a liking for it.

Explanation: It is almost similar to ‘It has grown on me’, and people even get confused between their usages. But I have seen many examples and found out that ‘it is an acquired taste’ is used for a thing that not many people like at first, but they develop a liking for it with time. On the other hand, ‘it grew on me’ is used for something that you didn’t like at first but developed a liking with time.

Example: Beer is an acquired taste for him. He didn’t like it at first, but now he enjoys it.

Idiomatic Expression

It appeals to me: It is often used for ideas that you really like, though you can it other situations as well, depending on whether it fits there or not.

Example: Wearing black leather jackets on white T-shirt appeals to me.

Did you like today’s article?
Or
Are you addicted to this blog?
Or
Has it grown on you?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views with the use of any of the above expressions or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

10 common Idiomatic Expressions with meaning and examples

10 common Idiomatic Expression with meaning and examples

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Entrepreneurship has been scaling up(Click here!) in everyone’s mind since the internet found its existence in this universe, especially during these days when social media is on its heights.

Seeing entrepreneurs in the lap of luxury lifestyle and of course, supercars and models looks like an icing on the cake, but the sad part is, people ignore the amount of work they have to put in, in order to get their names in top entrepreneurs of their country. People are under an impression, usually because of those videos and photos depicting luxurious lifestyle, cars and jets, that entrepreneurship is so comforting and lavishing, though quite the inverse is true.

More often than not, people usually say what they want and it seems funnier when they follow a motivational page that often quotes something like ‘never give up’ or ‘I will be win…blah blah’ and whatsoever. The matter of the fact is, people post them as their stories and kick back, wondering they would also earn millions one day.

I understand every person doesn’t have the same beliefs and thoughts, and many people would be like “Knock it off” as it is a bitter truth.

But if you start working for your goal day in and day out, there are hands down(Click here!) no chances that you would be kicking yourself for a wrong decision that you opted just for the sake of those luxurious supercars, models, and jets.

Now I am not trying to be a know-it-all, playing safe is certainly not that I believe in, but if your dreams are big enough, you will have to put in your heart and soul day in, day out.

I want you all to be happy and thriving in your life and reach your aspirations.

And there is only one way to do this, and that is to work each day of your life till the time you reach your final destination. Of course, you don’t have to post a story on social media this time, about your thoughts, and how motivated you are, but work until you achieve something and let the world see your actions rather than hearing your thoughts.


10 Idiomatic Expressions with meaning and examples

Idiomatic Expression

In the lap of luxury – Having luxurious and comfortable life due to the abundance of money and fame.

Idiomatic Expression in the lap of luxury

Examples-
  • After winning a lottery of $10 million, he is in the lap of luxury now.
  • John is never given the deserved credit for his talent because he was born in the lap of luxury.

Idiomatic Expression

An icing on the cake – An additional benefit or positive aspect of something that is already considered positive or beneficial.

Idiomatic Expression icing on the cake

Examples-
  • I was so happy that all my friends came to my party. The decorations and gifts were like an ice on the cake.
  • I got $5000 as a bonus from the company. Moreover, the free trip for a week was the icing on the cake.

Idiomatic Expression

Under a wrong impression – to misinterpret something.

Idiomatic Expression under the wrong impression

Examples-
  • I was under the impression that Joe is your real brother.
  • John is under the impression that Emma likes him.

Idiomatic Expression

More often than not – most of the time, usually.

Idiomatic Expression more often than not

Examples-
  • More often than not I drink coffee in the morning, but I can drink tea if you don’t have any coffee left.
  • He is in gym more often than not, and you can clearly notice how much he has changed.

Idiomatic Expression

kick back – to relax.

Idiomatic Expression kick back

Examples:
  • We have been working for the whole day, it’s time now to kick back and have some drink.
  • I am going to kick back when I am done writing this post.

Idiomatic Expression

Knock it off – to stop it.

Idiomatic Expression knock it off

Examples
  • You are shouting too loud, knock it off!
  • It’s time you should knock this loud music off, else you will be yelled by your parents.

Idiomatic Expression

Day in and day out – every day, we usually use this to refer to something we have been working on for a long period of time.

Idiomatic Expression Day in and day out

Examples:
  • I have been working on this website day in and day out, and now it’s finally ready.
  • You have to work day in and day out in order to succeed in this project.

Idiomatic Expression

Kick yourself – to regret a wrong decision or choice.

Idiomatic Expression kick yourself

Examples:
  • He invested in a wrong company, now he has nothing but to kick himself for that.
  • You should work hard at this age; else you will kick yourself in the future.

Idiomatic Expression

Know-it-all – a person who acts as though he or she knows everything and who dismisses the opinions, comments, or suggestions of others.

Idiomatic Expression know-it-all

Examples:
  • Pushkar always keeps bothering me with his tips while I play, he thinks he knows it all.
  • Joe has always something to say in between, he is such a know-it-all.

Idiomatic Expression

Play it safe – It means to not take any unwarranted risks or dangers; to act with caution and prudence.

Idiomatic Expression play it safe

Examples:
  • You have two options in life; either you play it safe or go for your dreams without fear.
  • Playing safe won’t get you bigger and life of your dreams.

I am sure you would have learned a lot from today’s idiomatic expressions article, and added some of them to your active English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our idioms exercise or idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page to practice these idiomatic expressions.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at:  [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idioms and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

Idiomatic Expressions you should start using Today!

Idiomatic Expressions you should start using Today!

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Sundar Raman, the chief executive officer of our company was all pumped up (Click here!) for the tender which our company was most likely to get. It drived him up the wall when someone from the staff spilled the beans about the last trip we had. The project was to be submitted the next day, but as the whole staff was out for a trip on this weekend, as a result no proper reports and project was ready to hand in.

Mr.Raman called up (Click here!) the whole staff for a meeting in his room.

Panic was in the air…

No one knew what to do; everyone was on the same boat and had nothing but to pass the buck and escape this complex situation.

The submission date was the next day and in case the company failed to submit the project for the tender, it would suffer the loss of millions of dollar. The work was equally distributed among all staff members. Project completion was only possible if everyone did their share.

There was no point beating around the bush now because completion of the project was hands down not a piece of cake and time was continuously running.

Zeroing in on the details and stats, the whole staff was back to their desk for the completion of the project.

 

Idiomatic Expressions and their meaning

 

Idiomatic Expression – spilled the beans

Idiomatic Expression spill the beans

Meaning – It means to reveal a secret.
Example –
  • I guess Susan was the one who spilled the beans of our plan.
  • I hate those people who can’t keep a secret and spill the beans.

Idiomatic Expression – hand in.

Idiomatic Expression hand in

Meaning – It means to submit.
Example –
  • You have to hand in these documents to the professor by tomorrow.
  • If you don’t hand in the application form by this Thursday, you won’t be able to apply for the job then.

Idiomatic Expression – in the air.

Idiomatic Expression in the air

Meaning – It means everywhere, all around.
Example –
  • There is so much fear in the air since these riots started.
  • Love is in the air, everywhere you look around.

Idiomatic Expression – on the same boat.

Idiomatic Expression in the same boat

Meaning – It means to be in the same situation.
Example –
  • Ben: “I don’t have any money right now. Can you give me $100? I will return within a week.”

Robin: “My boss fired me yesterday.”

Ben: “No problem man, I understand. We are in the same boat.”

  •  John and me are in the same boat; we both don’t know what study stream we should go in.

Idiomatic Expression – pass the buck.

Idiomatic Expression pass the buck

Meaning – It means to shift blame to the other person.
Example –
  • Don’t pass the buck now; you already have lost so much of time in falling out (Click here).
  • Chris and John have been passing bucks on each other; no one knows who has the box.

Idiomatic Expression – do one’s share.

Idiomatic Expression to do one's share

Meaning – It means to do one’s part in a group activity.
Example –
  • We can get this whole place cleaned if everyone does his/her share.
  • You should not see what others are doing rather you should do your share.

Idiomatic Expression – beat around the bush.

Idiomatic Expression beat around the bush

Meaning – It means to avoid getting to the point.
Example –
  • Stop beating around the bush and tell me what you want from me.
  • There is no point beating around the bush, you should tell them your demands and condition right away (Click here!) for approval.

Idiomatic Expression – hands down.

Idiomatic Expression hands down

Meaning – It means definitely, without a doubt.
Example –
  • Hanz de fuko is hands down one of the most trusted and reputed hair product company in the market.
  • It’s hands down an unfair judgment for the blue team in this entire tournament.

Idiomatic Expression – piece of cake.

Idiomatic Expression piece of cake

Meaning – It means something that is very easy to do.
Example –
  • Completing the whole book within a day is definitely not a piece of cake.
  • I can do 50 squats without a break. It’s a piece of cake for me.

Idiomatic Expression – Zero in on something.

Idiomatic Expression zero in on

Meaning – It means to aim or focus on something or someone.
Example –
  • The athlete was zeroed in on winning the match and he won.
  • Most of the people zero in on a goal but loose the consistency of practice.

Hopefully you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these idiomatic expressions from this English expressions list to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete the Idiomatic Expressions exercise or Idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these English expression list (I know it’s not that long, but the motive was to permanent them in your mind) and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Please share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s Idiomatic Expressions Quiz?

Since you learnt some new idiomatic expressions today, let's test your knowledge of these idioms through this Idioms Quiz

Choose the most appropriate idiomatic expression among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Business Idioms & Expression with Context and Quiz

Business Idioms & Expression with Context and Quiz 

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Mr.Steven, the chief executive officer of one of the most trusted and reputed multinational company in Mumbai received a legal notice from the government yesterday about the growing debts of the company. He was nervous wreck (Click here!) for the fact that the company which made a killing in the whole market was now going down the drain.

A ballpark figure of loss which the company incurred in the last six months was almost $100 million”, said some of the reports by the company.

Mr.Robin, the right hand man of Steve, called up (Click here!) all the staff members and company investors for a meeting to brainstorm some ways, hoping to scale up (Click here!) the graph of growth of the company ASAP which was skyrocketing in debts and loans.

It was a no brainer that each staff member including Mr.Steven had to go an extra mile to keep the company up and running in the market. After the meeting got over, all went off to their home, but Mr.Steven went back in his office where he sat for the whole night going through all the files and documents.

He slept in his office only, wondering whether he and his members will be able to make it or the company which he has given everything to, will be lost down the line (Click here!).

Business Idioms list- with Idioms Quiz and Examples

Idiomatic Expression – Make a killing

business idioms make a killing

Meaning – To make a lot of money.

Examples

  • Jio made a killing even after giving free Internet for a whole year to all his customers.
  • Google made a killing on its launch of latest Smartphone.

Idiomatic Expression – down the drain

idiomatic expression down the drain

Meaning – destroyed or on the way to be lost or wasted.

Examples

  • No matter how hard you tried to win the match, a small mistake and everything goes down the drain.
  • The organization promised to help the poor and the needy, but now it seems to go down the drain.

Idiomatic Expression – A ballpark figure

idiomatic expression ballpark figure

Meaning – an estimated figure or amount of something.

Examples

  • I can give you a ballpark figure of what we made in the last six months, it was around $200,000.
  • A ballpark figure if I have to say, this building would be almost $25 million.

Idiomatic Expression – right hand man

idiomatic expression right hand man

Meaning – a helper or chief assistant.

Examples

  • His right hand man would be the last person you wanna ever meet.
  • I don’t know how he manages such a big multinational company without a right hand man.

Idiomatic Expression – brainstorm

idiomatic expression brainstorm

Meaning – To think about some new ideas, usually in a group to get some solution of a problem.

Examples

  • I was brainstorming if we could make some changes in the staff duty to get some positive results in the growth of the company.
  • We have to brainstorm some new ways to tackle these situations or we will have to start off (Click here!)again.

Idiomatic Expression – ASAP

idiomatic expression ASAP

Meaning – It is an acronym meaning as soon as possible.

Examples

  • We really need to take care of our environment ASAP before things get worse.
  • I really need to finish off this documentary ASAP before I get another reminder from my boss.

Idiomatic Expression – Skyrocketing

idiomatic expression skyrocket

Meaning – to increase rapidly.

Examples

  • Due to skyrocketing numbers of real time visiters, Emma upgraded her plan to premium.
  • She has seen her customers skyrocketing since she made some changes in the SEO and marketing strategies of her site.

Idiomatic Expression – No brainer

idiomatic expression no brainer

Meaning – something that is really easy and obvious.

Examples

  • It’s a no brainer that in order to achieve more, your need to work more.
  • I really don’t know why he waits for me every time to stop him from eating so much in front of others, it’s a no brainer.

Idiomatic Expression – Go an extra mile

extra mile

Meaning – to make more effort than is expected of you (usually to please someone).

Examples

  • My girlfriend often goes an extra mile for setting up (Click here!) my birthday party.
  • We really need to go an extra mile to compensate the losses we incurred till now.

Idiomatic Expression – Up and running

idiomatic expression up and running

Meaning – operating or functioning properly.

Examples

  • Though it took time, the mechanic got my washing machine up and running.
  • I can’t tell you how happy I am to see my company up and running in the whole market.

 

I am sure you would have learnt a lot from today’s business idioms article and added some of them to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our idioms exercise or idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page to practice these business idioms.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idioms and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass this business idioms quiz?

Since you learnt some new business idioms today, let's test your knowledge of these idiomatic expressions through this Idioms Quiz

Choose the most appropriate idiomatic expression among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Improve your vocabulary with these idioms

Improve your vocabulary with these idioms.

Hey there,Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Mrs. Watson (The class teacher) told a week ago that the school will be organizing a competition for acting and sports where there are going to be some big-shot personalities to judge and find out the real talent in us. I don’t know why, but when it comes to act and play, it is in my element.

For Joe (my close friend) it was definitely not an easy decision. He got nervous wreck (Click here!) fearing he might choke at the stage while performing. I encouraged him for a while, the next moment he was all ready, pumped up (Click here!) to take part in this competition.

Though I gave him much of the motivation so he takes part in the competition, but I really wanted that it should be his decision finally to perform at stage, so I asked him to sleep on it and then decide what he really wants to do.

I had to get to school earlier but since I slept in (Click here!), I got ready in few minutes, grabbed a bite to eat and reached the place.

The competition started and all performed as if they have been doing this for ages. Soon after the competition the results were announced which took us by surprise(surprised) when we heard that Joe won the competition. Though I did not win it, I was on cloud nine (Click here!) , maybe because one of my close friends has won it.

Idioms

Big-shot

big shot

Meaning

An important or famous person.

Example

  •  People making it to this award function are all big-shots.
  • You really don’t wanna mess with the director, he is a big-shot.

To be in one’s element

comfort

Meaning

It is used when you are completely comfortable doing something that comes very naturally.

Example

  • Doing cardio and stretches is in Ben’s element.
  • People don’t experience any adventure or fact when they try to be in their element.

Sleep on it

sleep on it

Meaning

It is used when you want the other person to think deeply about something and then give their final decision.

 Example

  • You are in anger now, sleep on it today and tell me your decision then.
  • I think you should sleep on it and then decide to quit or not, so you never regret it, after all not everyone gets to work here.

Note: It is said so because often times we react to someone/something in anger that we regret down the line. So there is a saying that if we sleep and then make a decision, it is in balanced state of mind because when something is important , making a decision after a good night sleep is a good decision.

Grab a bite to eat

grab a bite

Meaning

To get something to eat.

Example

  • Lemme grab something to eat and then we can go out.
  • Tony grabbed something to eat before office and went to his apartment right away (Click here!).

For ages

for ages

Meaning

From a long period of time.

Example

  • I have not tried basketball for ages.
  • I was surprised when a small kid performed at the event; it seemed he has been doing this for ages. 

Improve your English vocabulary with these idioms and make sure you make them your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

We need to clear things out…

Phrasal verbs or idioms?

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Don’t get me wrong I know Friday is supposed to be an idiom post but, since I noticed some of people asking me about Wednesday’s post, I think it’s about time to clear things out. You might wanna ask?

What was wrong with Wednesday’s post?

Well, there was nothing wrong with it, but that post was to be published today since it was an idiom post. I could not back it up since the notification email was sent to many of the subscribers and deleting the post and posting a new one definitely not seemed the right choice to me. So I came up with this idea that I would rather write a post covering not just phrasal verbs or idioms, but both.

I am sure you will love it as it has both so keep backing up and learning.

Meanings

• About time – nearly time, high time.

• Clear things out – to explain or solve the misunderstanding or confusion.

• Back it up – reverse.

• Came up with – to suggest or think of an idea or plan.

• Back up – support.

 

Examples

• I think it’s about time I bought a new laptop.

• Ron needs to clear things out with his wife before his married life leads to divorce.

• You just can’t back things up when they reach to the extremities.

•Dwayne came up with this idea of holding a conference every Saturday for our company’s growth.

• My mother always backs me up with my dreams and ambitions.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below or email me at: [email protected]

Practice and learn with the techniques as I mentioned in this blog – “How to learn phrasal verbs and idioms?” (Click here if you missed it!)

Make sure you share it with your friends and family and don’t forget to subscribe (It’s free! Do it now…) so that you never miss a post.

Keep learning and improving.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Don’t get angry now!

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well… I guess you are improving your English vocabulary at a very nice pace which I think is quite commendable. So first I would like you to applaud for how much you learnt till now because it means a lot.

I know, it’s just the starting but we are doing quite well and if you keep going like this, you will definitely notice a high curve of improvement in your spoken English and vocabulary. So usually I like to first start off with the context, then the meaning and examples. But today I thought I should write about a particular emotion which I often face when people don’t like something about a situation or me.

You got me?

Yeah, you are right.

It’s anger.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business and learn some of the idioms which convey this emotion ‘Anger or frustration’, so here are the anger idioms:

  • Get on someone’s nerve

Meaning: Irritate someone a lot that they come on the verge of anger.

Examples:

  • The kids get on her nerve at times.
  • Don’t mind John but your continuous speaking is getting on my nerves now.

 

  • Go ballistic

Meaning: To become very angry.

Examples:

  • Susan’s went ballistic when she came to know that her daughter Emma failed again.
  • My father went ballistic when he realized I am not attending the upcoming semester exams.

 

  • Drive someone up the wall

Meaning: It has a similar meaning to that of ‘get on someone’s nerve’. It means to irritate someone to an extent that they get on the verge of getting angry.

Examples:

  • It drives me up the wall when I hear fake excuses.
  • It drives me up the wall when people are busy in their cell phones during a conversation.

 

  • Fly off the handle/Fly into a rage

Meaning: To become suddenly angry.

Examples:

  • My boss flew into the rage when he learnt that I did not complete the report.
  • The class teacher flew off the handle seeing the whole class shouting and making noise.

 

  • Get your knickers in a twist

Meaning: When you get your knickers in a twist, it means you are angry, nervous or upset with the present situation.

Examples:

  • Don’t get your knickers in a twist; I will get the car repaired by tomorrow.
  • My boss got his knickers in a twist knowing the fact they incurred a loss of $50,000.

 

Hope you did not hit the ceiling (Click here!) after reading this ‘anger’ blog and understood it quite well.

Let me know about your views about these anger idioms (without getting angry, haha).

Make sure you share and subscribe.

Till then, take care and?

Bye bye.