7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

Believe it or not, conversational phraseology plays an important part in deciding if you are a good English speaker or not. And when it comes to conversation, if you don’t know the right phraseology to express your opinions in English, you may soon draw a blank at any point in your conversation.

A conversation usually consists of starter phrases, a little discussion, agreeing and disagreeing. And when it comes to disagreeing, repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’ over and again can make your conversation monotonous and boring. It is for this fact, I thought why not add some expressions which you can use instead of repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today’s article is a part of our “7 Power Expression Series” which will cover seven different ways you can show your disagreement while conversing.
So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


 

Idiomatic Expression

  • I beg to differ
  • Explanation: It is a polite way of disagreeing with someone else. It is hands-down the best phrase to use when it comes to formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I beg to differ with you, but I think we should complete our projects first and then plan the conference.
  • I am sorry sir, but I beg to differ from your opinion.

Idiomatic Expression

  • No way!
  • Explanation: It is a strong phrase that you should only use in informal situations. You can use it to show a strong disagreement about something that you think is impossible to happen.
  • Examples:
  • There is no way you are gonna win this match. He is a pro wrestler.
  • A: He will definitely top in his class this year.
    B: No way!

Idiomatic Expression

  • I don’t think so.
  • Explanation: You can use this to show your slight disagreement and when you think the said statement is untrue, but you are not completely sure.
  • Examples:
  • A: Such a serious issue should be handled by the government.
  • B: Well, I don’t think so. I think common people should take their stand for the cause.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I totally disagree with that point
  • Explanation: The above phrase is quite strong, so make sure you do not use it in formal situations. It is just a way to show strong disagreement with somebody’s opinion or point.
  • Examples:
  • I totally disagree with the idea of investing in a company that hardly has any investors.
  • A: I think the government should provide free shelter and food for everyone.
    B: I totally disagree with that point. It will affect our economy if we start giving everything for free.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not so sure about that.
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase to show your disagreement to a point when you not so sure about the other person’s statement.
  • Examples:
  • A: He could have done better if he has taken coaching from my institute.
    B: I am not so sure about that. He is hardly passionate about learning.
  • A: They would have won the match, had they included Ron in the match.
    B: I am not so sure about that.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Not necessarily
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase when you doubt if the statement is true.
  • Examples:
  • A: He is lying for sure.
    B: Not necessarily.
  • A: I think the results would have been different, had there been no rain yesterday.
    B: Not necessarily.

Idiomatic Expression

  • That’s not always the case.
  • Explanation: You can say this expression when you want to convey that the statement said by the other person might not be always true.
  • Examples:
  • A: I think people of my society are solely responsible for this entire problem.
    B: Well, that’s not always the case. Sometimes the management doesn’t take their responsibility seriously.

I hope these expressions will add value to your active vocabulary and improve your spoken English. Make sure you go through this article once again and learn them off by heart so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

7 Love Idioms you should know this Valentine

Did you fall for someone or you were smitten by them?

Or was it just a crush?

Love is in the air these days, isn’t it?

And you must be having some quality time with your partners this week.

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, I thought why not add an article to ‘The Seven Power Expression Series’ related to love and relationships.

Hey everyone out there,

How are you all doing today?

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let get down to the business and learn some phraseology related to attraction and love, so you never draw a blank in your conversation this Valentine:


Infographic Presentation

Love idioms


 

Idiomatic Expression

Fall for someone: To be attracted to someone and start loving them.
Examples:

  • I think he has fallen for Emma; he always tries to find ways to be around her.
  • We both met each other at a friend’s party and fell for each other.

Idiomatic Expression

Have the hots for someone: To have a romantic attraction towards someone.
Examples:

  • The way she looked at you at my birthday party, she definitely has the hots for him.
  • He has the hots for the young lady who joined yesterday.

    Idiomatic Expression

    Have a soft spot for someone: If you have a soft spot for someone, you like them a lot.
    Examples:

  • He definitely has a soft spot for Susan; he keeps looking at her.
  • Did you have a soft spot for Emma during high school time?

Idiomatic Expression

Smitten with: To be strongly drawn to somebody.
Examples:

  • She was smitten by him the moment she saw him at the bar.
  • Medha was smitten by Chris as she saw his football skills.

Idiomatic Expression

Love to death: Feel extremely strong affection for someone or love someone all your life.
Examples:

  • The lady loved her husband to death. Even when he left him, she kept his belongings as a memory.
  • John loves Emma to death. He just can’t imagine a single day without her.

Idiomatic Expression

Have a crush on: to have romantic feelings for someone.
Examples:

  • I think Ron has a crush on Emma. He always keeps on talking about her.
  • Do you have a crush on any Hollywood celebrity?

Idiomatic Expression

Have eyes only for: To be romantically interested or loyal to one individual.
Examples:

  • Jane always has eyes only for Robert; she has never dated any other man.
  • Though he may not be expressive, he only has eyes for you.

Well, that’s it for today and I hope you would have enjoyed going through this lovely chapter. Make sure you learn all these idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through these expressions once again, so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then buy some gifts for your partner, enjoy your Valentine’s Day, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

7 ways to say “I agree” in English

Life is fair because it is unfair to all, isn’t it?

I guess you seem to agree with me on that point.

And when it comes to agreeing with someone, saying ‘I agree’ over and again can make your conversation boring and monotonous.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I am sure you would have got the idea till now what this chapter is all about.

Well, in case you don’t, today we will learn about 7 different ways how you can show your agreement with the other person without using the usual phrase over and again ‘I agree’. So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:

7 ways to say ‘I  agree’ in English

Infographic Presentation

Expression 1
Absolutely
  • Explanation: You can use this when you agree with the other person with no qualification, restriction, or limitation.
    Example:
  • John: He failed because he has not read even a single chapter.
  • Ben: Absolutely!
Expression 2
You can say that again
  • Explanation: It is used when you agree with the other person’s statement so much that you are willing to hear that again. It’s just a way to show how strongly you believe whatever the person has said to you.
    Example:
  • Susan: I think we should take a break now. We have been working for the whole day.
  • Ben: You can say that again.
Expression 3
That’s so true.
  • Explanation: You can use this when you think the other person’s statements are up to the point and are totally correct.
    Example:
  • A: It’s worthless if he tries to invest more in such a failing project.
  • B: That’s so true.
Expression 4
Tell me about it! 
  • Explanation: You can use this when you want to say that you feel the same way or have had the same experience in the past. It is a bit informal so make sure you better don’t use it in formal situations.
    Examples:
  • A: His boring sad songs irritate me so much.
  • B: Tell me about it!
  • A: This exercise is so exhausting.
  • B: Tell me about it!
Expression 5
I suppose/guess so.
  • Explanation: There are certain situations where you will agree but weakly. It is this situation where this phrase ‘I suppose so’ comes in handy. You can use this phrase for weak agreements where you agree, but reluctantly.
    Examples:
  • A: He will get through his examination this time.
  • B: I suppose so.
Expression 6
I couldn’t agree with you more.
  • Explanation: It’s an expression to show how strongly you agree with the other person’s statement. Many a time, non-natives misunderstand the meaning of this expression as disagreement because of the use of the word ‘not’. It simply means that you completely agree with the statement.
    Example:
  • A: The boss should at least give us a break this weekend.
  • B: I couldn’t agree with you more.
Expression 7
You have a point there.
  • Explanation: You can use this when the person in front is explaining you something and says a statement that you completely agree with.
    Example:
  • A: Had they included their main players in the match, they would have won it.
  • B: You have a point there.

I think the information presented in this article is easy to learn, isn’t it?

What would you say?

I couldn’t agree with you more.
Or
That’s so true.

Or something else?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views and suggestions with the use of any of the above expressions.

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to say ‘I like it’ in English

Do you like football?

Yeah, I like it.

What about acting?

I like that too.

Do you like cricket?

Yeah, I like it.

Hey everyone out there,
Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well, it sometimes becomes so boring when you have to use a single expression or phrase over and again; moreover, it kind of turns off the person in front to continue any further conversation. And I just don’t wanna see you in any of such situations. So I was busy developing this series of chapters which covers different ways to say something so that your conversation never becomes so boring and meaningless and you can always have an edge on others while you chat.

I was confused if how many expressions should I include in a single chapter because some people get confused when you throw them loads of information at once, so I considered an average number seven which was neither less now more to learn, hence came the name – The Seven Power Expression Series, which would cover seven different ways you can get across your message to the person in front.

And I know my readers are wise enough to get what I am about to cover in this chapter, can you guess?

Yeah, you are dead right.

Today we will cover seven expressions you can use instead of the phrase ‘I like it’.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Presentation

Idiomatic Expression


 

Idiomatic Expression

It grew on me: It grew on me means that you didn’t like something when you first encountered it, but over time, you learned to like it.

Explanation: There are certain things which you don’t like at the first time, but when you keep doing it or using it, you start to like it. Let’s say your friend has a video game which he really likes, so he lends it to you for checking it out. And when you first play it, you don’t like it, but after playing for a while or some days, you start enjoying it. It is this situation when this idiomatic expression comes in handy and you can say something like this: “It grew on me.”

Example: The music CD you gave me last weekend grew on me.

Idiomatic Expression

I am fond of it: It means you have liked something for a long time or may have an emotional attachment to it.

Explanation: Use this when you wanna put weight on how much liking you have for a certain thing or a person.

Example: John is fond of his sports bike; he just can’t live even for a day without it.

Idiomatic Expression

It’s to my liking – It is a formal way of saying ‘I like it’.

Explanation: There are situations like a business meeting or applications where things are more formal and it is always a better option to go with formal vocabulary. Although using the phrase ‘I like it’ in formal situations is not at all wrong, but the above phrase fits better in the particular situation.

Example: Conferences every weekend is to my liking. It helps us bring up new ideas for upcoming projects.

Idiomatic Expression

I am addicted to it: It means when you like something so much that you can’t live even a day without it.

Explanation: We often use it for negative situations, but it’s not necessary that it has always to be used for negatives only. You can even get addicted to a music that you really like or be it any activity like exercising.

Example: I am addicted to rock concerts.

Idiomatic Expression

I am crazy about: It means you really follow and love something inside out.

Explanation: The expression changes from ‘I am crazy about’ to ‘I am mad about’, or ‘I am passionate about’ depending on person to person but they all mean the same. They all show your love and liking for a particular thing or a person.

Example: Emma is crazy about Hollywood movies.

Idiomatic Expression

It is an acquired taste: It means something that most of the people don’t like at first, but with time, they start to develop a liking for it.

Explanation: It is almost similar to ‘It has grown on me’, and people even get confused between their usages. But I have seen many examples and found out that ‘it is an acquired taste’ is used for a thing that not many people like at first, but they develop a liking for it with time. On the other hand, ‘it grew on me’ is used for something that you didn’t like at first but developed a liking with time.

Example: Beer is an acquired taste for him. He didn’t like it at first, but now he enjoys it.

Idiomatic Expression

It appeals to me: It is often used for ideas that you really like, though you can it other situations as well, depending on whether it fits there or not.

Example: Wearing black leather jackets on white T-shirt appeals to me.

Did you like today’s article?
Or
Are you addicted to this blog?
Or
Has it grown on you?

Lemme know in the comment section below about your views with the use of any of the above expressions or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idiomatic expressions and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

30 common Homophone words you should know

List of 30 most common homophone words

I eight five packets of biscuit yesterday.

Yeah, I did.

Or is it?

I ‘ate’ five packets of biscuit.

English pronunciations are quite weird sometimes, isn’t it?

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

What are homophones?

Homophones are the words that have exactly the same pronunciation but different meaning. The root of the word ‘Homo’ means ‘same’, while ‘phone’ means sound. Be it a non-native or native, people get confused with these homophones because of the same pronunciation; so you see, you are not alone. There is no doubt ‘practice makes a man perfect’, and the same goes with learning homophones. They are not that easy, but with a regular practice and proper learning, it will be a piece of cake for you.

Homophones vs Homonyms?

 

I completely get it when a non-native can’t differentiate between homophones and homonyms. The fact is, even natives make mistake and think homophones and homonyms are same. Breaking down the word ‘homonym’, we get ‘homo’ that means ‘same’, and ‘nym’ that means ‘name’.

So basically, Homonyms are the words that have the same spelling but different meanings.

Let’s see some of the examples of homonyms for a better understanding:

  • Pole (meaning 1): either of the two locations at the opposite ends of the earth’s axis.
  • Pole (meaning 2): a long, thin rounded piece of wood or metal, used as a support
  • Bark (meaning 1): the sharp, sudden cry of a dog, fox, or seal
  • Bark (meaning 2): the tough protective outer covering of the trunk.

30 Most Common Homophone Words With Sentences

There are hundreds like them and it may be possible you know a few of them, or almost all of them. I tried to cover the most common homophones so that even a beginner can understand. Make sure you practice them off by heart and sooner they will become your active vocabulary. So without a further ado, let’s get down to the business:

Accept/ Except

Accept (verb): consent to receive or undertake.

Example: I accepted his proposal for the meeting this weekend.

Except (Preposition): not including, other than.

Example: Everyone came to my birthday party, except Ben.

Advice/ Advise

Advice (noun): guidance or recommendation about what someone should do.

Example: You should always follow his advice if you want to improve in your game.

Advise (verb): recommend that someone should do something.

Example: He advised his brother not to be in the bad company of rogues.

Ate/ Eight

Ate (verb): The past form of ‘eat’.

Example: I ate my lunch after I came from school.

Eight (noun): The number between seven and nine.

Example: There are eight rooms in our house.

bear/ bare

Bare (adjective):  not clothed or covered.

Example: He bared his chest to show his scar.

Bear (noun): a large, heavy mammal with thick fur and very soft tail.

Example: I saw a black bear in the zoo yesterday.

desert/ dessert

Desert (noun): a waterless area of land with little or no vegetation typically covered with sand.

Example: Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world.

Dessert (noun): the sweet course eaten at the end of the meal.

Example: I don’t think a meal is complete without a dessert.

deer/ dear

Deer (noun): a hoofed animal, the male of which usually has antlers.

Example: I saw a deer on a roadside while dropping Joe to school.

Dear (Adjective): regarded with deep affection

Example: “God bless you my dear son”, said the church father.

die/ dye

Die (verb): to stop living.

Example: His uncle died in a car accident.

Dye (noun): natural or synthetic substance used to color something.

Example: He bought a dye for just 50 cents.

band/ banned

Band (noun): a flat, thin strip or loop of material used as a fastener or as decoration.

Example: John gave Emma a friendship band on her birthday.

Banned (verb): past form of the ban.

Example: Alcohol has been banned for some days in some of the cities due to the increasing number of accidents.

by/ buy

By (preposition): indicating the person or thing performing an action or the means of achieving something.

Example: He came to my house by bus.

Buy (verb): obtain something in exchange for payment.

Example: I will buy a car this month because I am exhausted with my old bike.

fair/ fare

Fair (adjective): treating people equally.

Example: That was definitely not a fair competition to give an extra chance to his brother.

Fare (noun): the money a passenger on public transport has to pay.

Example: The fare for this concert is too high to afford.

haul/ hall

Haul (verb): To pull or drag something with effort.

Example: He hauled his bike out of the shed.

Hall (noun): the room or space just inside the front entrance of a house.

Example: The students were ordered to assemble in the hall so that admit cards could be distributed.

higher/ hire

Higher (adjective): the comparative degree of high.

Example: The prices of these products go higher every day.

Hire (verb): pay to be allowed to use something for an agreed period.

Example: He is hired for a year as an accountant in a multi-national company.

its/ it’s

Its (possessive determiner): belonging to or associated with a thing previously mentioned or easily identified.

Example: The Company has doubled its profits and sales in the previous six months.

It’s (contraction): it is or it has.

Example: It’s my choice whether I take up his offer or not.

know/ no

Know (verb): be aware of something through observation, inquiry or information.

Example: I don’t know if he will accept your proposal or not.

No (noun): The opposite of ‘yes’.

Example: This will be a no from the judges on the panel.

won/ one

Won (verb): past and past participle of win.

Example: Though it was a tough competition, we won the match.

One (noun): The lowest cardinal number.

Example: I have only one piece of the suit now.

 

How many of them were new to you?

A Few? Or almost all?

We will keep adding more of them somewhere in the future so that you never get confused about their meaning and usage. Make sure you stick around and improve your English vocabulary by learning these homophones off by heart so that you never make any mistake down the line.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

Don’t bite off more you can chew

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

First and foremost, I will let you in on some updates why I am not able to post on scheduled days. I was extremely busy for two weeks because I am working on a series of articles which I will publish in the month of February. It basically is a series of seven chapters which I will publish regularly for seven days that cover different topics and areas (You will know when I publish them). The matter of the fact is, due to that and some of my personal work, I only posted twice a week which was more before. It may happen sometimes that I don’t post on a scheduled day, but trust me guys I work day in and out just for helping guys like you and other non-native English speaker to speak confidently like a native.

I hope you understand for not posting on scheduled days recently, so please keep supporting like you have been doing till now.

I receive emails where people sometimes complain that they can’t remember all the vocabulary and whatever they learn. All I can say is, don’t bite more than you can chew.

Improving English is not an overnight process and it definitely takes time and practices, so no matter how many courses you do or eBooks you read, the fact is, you achieve fluency only after a good amount of time you spend on speaking and vocabulary when you keep practicing.

It is for this fact that I would recommend you keep patience because no matter how many specialized courses or eBooks you go for, it will definitely require time.

Where the most people miss out?

More often than not, when people realize that idioms and phrasal verbs are the main parts of spoken English, they just Google the list of idioms and phrasal verbs and try mugging them up, so they become fluent the next day. But scouring every single page on Google won’t help you achieve your maximum fluency. It is a fact that if you learn the whole list, that too without context and practice quiz, you are more likely to forget 90% of them and I am saying this from my personal experience. Though I don’t doubt your mind, you may be one of the wisest guys in your social circle, but what I said is what facts say.

The bottom line is, stick to a few blogs that seems the best to you and follow the advice and content for noticing an improvement. And please keep patience, it never happens overnight.

It was not a normal blog, so I just casually wrote the content in one go what I really think was needed to convey my message and tell you about recent updates and how much you mean to me.

So please stick around; the upcoming articles will be full of informative content and I am sure you will love them.

Keep learning and improving.

Take care, and till then?

Bye-bye.

P.S: Bite off more you can chew- means to take more responsibility or commitment than what you can manage.

19 Kitchen Vocabulary with pictures

19 Kitchen Vocabulary with pictures

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I received an email yesterday which said-

Hello sir,
 I love your articles and the way you teach us. Idioms and phrases are no doubt an important part of learning English but I think many non-natives don’t know the daily used vocabulary. Can you please tell how to strengthen that? It will be great if you explain to me how to do it.
 Please reply.
 Regards,
 (Ms…………)

I was almost finished writing the reply when it struck my mind- may be many of the non-natives face this problem.

Back in earlier days, I was one of these non-natives who lacked daily used vocabulary words, so I thought better to address this issue today because somewhere down the line people face this issue sooner or later.

So I am here with a new category section of our blog that will focus on the vocabulary of items that are around us, or from which we all are surrounded in one or the other way. I may or may not include all the vocabulary considering the length of the blog, but I will try to include the most important ones from each area of our life.

I was confused what to start from, so I just picked a random topic from the list I created yesterday.

So let’s start with the kitchen vocabulary – the place where we cook our food to get the energy from. I am gonna keep it simple and straight to the point without beating around the bush (Click here!), so here we go-

Kitchen Vocabulary

Saucepan

kitchen vocabulary

It is a small round cooking pot for making a variety of sauces, gravies, and glazes. 


Cup & Saucer

kitchen vocabulary

A shallow dish, typically having a circular indentation in the centre, on which a cup is placed.


Bowl

kitchen vocabulary

A bowl is a round, open-top container used in many cultures to serve hot and cold food.


Skimmer

kitchen vocabulary

A skimmer is a flat, sieve-like scoop or spoon used for skimming cooking liquids or lifting ripened cream from milk.


Spatula

kitchen vocabulary

A spatula is a broad, flat, flexible blade used to mix, spread and lift material.


Knife and Fork

kitchen vocabulary


Vegetable Peeler

kitchen vocabulary

A peeler is a kitchen tool consisting of a slotted metal blade attached to a handle that is used to remove the outer skin or peel of certain vegetables, often potatoes and carrots, and fruits such as apples, pears, etc.


A Grater

kitchen vocabulary

A grater is a kitchen utensil used to grate foods into fine pieces.


Stove

kitchen vocabulary


Kettle

kitchen vocabulary

A kettle is a type of pot, typically metal, specialized for boiling water, with a lid, spout, and handle.


Pressure Cooker

kitchen vocabulary


Frying Pan

kitchen vocabulary


Mixer

kitchen vocabulary


Whisk

kitchen vocabulary

A whisk is a cooking utensil which can be used to blend ingredients smooth or to incorporate air into a mixture.


SIEVE/ Strainer

kitchen vocabulary

A device having holes punched in it or made of crossed wires for separating solid matter from a liquid.


Tongs

kitchen vocabulary

Tongs are a type of tool used to grip and lift objects instead of holding them directly with hands.


Ladle

kitchen vocabulary

A deep-bowled, long-handled spoon used especially for dipping up and conveying liquids.


I hope you would have found our article useful and learned some ‘Kitchen Vocabulary’ that you should add to your active vocabulary.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below or email us at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

P.S: I didn’t explain a few of the above vocabulary because they were self-understandable, hopefully, you will understand all by pictures itself. Then too, if you feel any problem, email us at: [email protected]

10 common Idiomatic Expressions with meaning and examples

10 common Idiomatic Expression with meaning and examples

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Entrepreneurship has been scaling up(Click here!) in everyone’s mind since the internet found its existence in this universe, especially during these days when social media is on its heights.

Seeing entrepreneurs in the lap of luxury lifestyle and of course, supercars and models looks like an icing on the cake, but the sad part is, people ignore the amount of work they have to put in, in order to get their names in top entrepreneurs of their country. People are under an impression, usually because of those videos and photos depicting luxurious lifestyle, cars and jets, that entrepreneurship is so comforting and lavishing, though quite the inverse is true.

More often than not, people usually say what they want and it seems funnier when they follow a motivational page that often quotes something like ‘never give up’ or ‘I will be win…blah blah’ and whatsoever. The matter of the fact is, people post them as their stories and kick back, wondering they would also earn millions one day.

I understand every person doesn’t have the same beliefs and thoughts, and many people would be like “Knock it off” as it is a bitter truth.

But if you start working for your goal day in and day out, there are hands down(Click here!) no chances that you would be kicking yourself for a wrong decision that you opted just for the sake of those luxurious supercars, models, and jets.

Now I am not trying to be a know-it-all, playing safe is certainly not that I believe in, but if your dreams are big enough, you will have to put in your heart and soul day in, day out.

I want you all to be happy and thriving in your life and reach your aspirations.

And there is only one way to do this, and that is to work each day of your life till the time you reach your final destination. Of course, you don’t have to post a story on social media this time, about your thoughts, and how motivated you are, but work until you achieve something and let the world see your actions rather than hearing your thoughts.


10 Idiomatic Expressions with meaning and examples

Idiomatic Expression

In the lap of luxury – Having luxurious and comfortable life due to the abundance of money and fame.

Idiomatic Expression in the lap of luxury

Examples-
  • After winning a lottery of $10 million, he is in the lap of luxury now.
  • John is never given the deserved credit for his talent because he was born in the lap of luxury.

Idiomatic Expression

An icing on the cake – An additional benefit or positive aspect of something that is already considered positive or beneficial.

Idiomatic Expression icing on the cake

Examples-
  • I was so happy that all my friends came to my party. The decorations and gifts were like an ice on the cake.
  • I got $5000 as a bonus from the company. Moreover, the free trip for a week was the icing on the cake.

Idiomatic Expression

Under a wrong impression – to misinterpret something.

Idiomatic Expression under the wrong impression

Examples-
  • I was under the impression that Joe is your real brother.
  • John is under the impression that Emma likes him.

Idiomatic Expression

More often than not – most of the time, usually.

Idiomatic Expression more often than not

Examples-
  • More often than not I drink coffee in the morning, but I can drink tea if you don’t have any coffee left.
  • He is in gym more often than not, and you can clearly notice how much he has changed.

Idiomatic Expression

kick back – to relax.

Idiomatic Expression kick back

Examples:
  • We have been working for the whole day, it’s time now to kick back and have some drink.
  • I am going to kick back when I am done writing this post.

Idiomatic Expression

Knock it off – to stop it.

Idiomatic Expression knock it off

Examples
  • You are shouting too loud, knock it off!
  • It’s time you should knock this loud music off, else you will be yelled by your parents.

Idiomatic Expression

Day in and day out – every day, we usually use this to refer to something we have been working on for a long period of time.

Idiomatic Expression Day in and day out

Examples:
  • I have been working on this website day in and day out, and now it’s finally ready.
  • You have to work day in and day out in order to succeed in this project.

Idiomatic Expression

Kick yourself – to regret a wrong decision or choice.

Idiomatic Expression kick yourself

Examples:
  • He invested in a wrong company, now he has nothing but to kick himself for that.
  • You should work hard at this age; else you will kick yourself in the future.

Idiomatic Expression

Know-it-all – a person who acts as though he or she knows everything and who dismisses the opinions, comments, or suggestions of others.

Idiomatic Expression know-it-all

Examples:
  • Pushkar always keeps bothering me with his tips while I play, he thinks he knows it all.
  • Joe has always something to say in between, he is such a know-it-all.

Idiomatic Expression

Play it safe – It means to not take any unwarranted risks or dangers; to act with caution and prudence.

Idiomatic Expression play it safe

Examples:
  • You have two options in life; either you play it safe or go for your dreams without fear.
  • Playing safe won’t get you bigger and life of your dreams.

I am sure you would have learned a lot from today’s idiomatic expressions article, and added some of them to your active English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our idioms exercise or idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page to practice these idiomatic expressions.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at:  [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idioms and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

10 Slangs words you should start using

10 Slangs words you should start using

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

How are you doing?

What!

What did you say?

Awesome!

It’s great then and I am so happy for you that you are doing great, but did you know that you used slang?

Yeah, I am talking about ‘Awesome’.

I have observed that most of the non natives don’t know what slang are, and a few who know its meaning try to avoid using it. There is a common misconception that using slang makes you bad and people often associate ‘slangs’ with ‘vulgar slangs’. Vulgar slangs are definitely something that you should hardly use but when it comes to slangs, I don’t agree when people don’t wanna use them.

There is no doubt you are a gentlemen and don’t like using bad words, so before you permanent this perception in your mind, make sure you read this article thoroughly and then assess if you were correct or not.

What are slangs?

Slang is vocabulary that is used between people who belong to the same social group and who know each other well. Slang is very informal language. It can be offending if you use them in formal situations. People often use slangs to sound less formal and be friendlier in the conversation.

When not to use slang words?

You need to extra cautious while using them in your conversation for they can be offensive, depending on the situation and person to person. You won’t say to your boss something like ‘Hey dude!’ or ‘Chill out’ for the fact your boss is not your friend. You can definitely use them with your friends but not on people like your boss, teachers or principal. So I am leaving it on you now to use them carefully in informal situations only.

Why to use slang words?

Would you like talking to your friends the way you wrote a formal application to your principal?

Or would you say something like this-

Please let know about your views and decisions at your earliest convenience. I would really grateful to you.

I will be anxiously waiting for your reply sir.

Regards,

Your name”

The answer is a big fat ‘NO’.

I guess 99.9% of you don’t speak to your friends in such a formal language.

And if you are among that 0.1%, sorry to say this article ends here for them, see you in next blog.

I guess you must be clear now with the concepts and use of slang and their meaning, so without further ado let’s see some of the most common English spoken slangs:

10 Slangs words you should start using

Slang 1

Kudos – when I first heard this slang on internet, I kinda got baffled about its meaning and use. I immediately googled it and found that it is used for showing respect. It means ‘congrats’ and if I am not wrong, this slang originated from North America.

Examples

  • Kudos to all the team members for winning the trophy.
  • Kudos Ron! You beat the fastest runner of our collage.
Slang 2

Dig – Here the slang doesn’t mean to make a hole. It is used for something you really like. Frankly speaking, I love using this slang because it sounds so cool.

Examples

  •  Hey Emma, I really dig your black leather jacket.
  •  I think you would dig the quiz down at the bottom of this article.
Slang 3

Cool- Did you notice I used it above? I know you are smart and read everything so thoroughly. Though I don’t think so that there would be a single person who doesn’t know what it means, but in case if you don’t, it means ‘great’ or ‘fantastic’.

Examples

  • I think the latest song from this pop singer was quite cool.
  • You always look so cool when you wear all denim.
Slang 4

Tight- It is used when the competitors are quite close and there is just a minor difference.

Examples

  • It was tight competition, both fighters fought till end.
  •  The competition was quite tight, nobody knew who will win the race.
Slang 5

Creep – an unpleasant person. It is a bit offensive, make sure you use it wisely.

Examples

  •  John always talks bad behind your back. He is such a creep.
  •  Robin often crosses the line when hitting on girls and comes off as a creep.
Slang 6

Buck – another term for dollar.

Examples

  • I don’t have even a buck in my pocket right now.
  •  Do you remember you have to pay me $1000 which you borrowed a week ago?
Slang 7

Beat – The word beat has many meaning in dictionary. You hear ‘a team beats the other’ which means they won, or it is used when someone hits someone like in this example -‘My uncle was beating his dog’, and in some cases it means ‘shit’. But when it comes to slang world, the meaning completely changes. It is used to say when you are ‘completely exhausted’.

Examples

  • A: Are you coming at party tonight?

B: I am beat. I don’t think so.

  •  He looks beat. He has been working out for an hour.
Slang 8

Crikey – It is used as an exclamation of surprise.

Examples

  • A: I invested all saving in that business.

B: Crikey! Did you not leave even a single buck?

Slang 9

Cram – it means to study hard and learn all in a short period of time.

Examples

  • Students often cram the entire notes just before few days from exam.
  •  He kept ignoring his studies till now, he now has to cram the entire course within a month.
Slang 10

Amped – it means you are super excited about something.

Examples

I am amped for the season finale today.

Josh was so amped for his first international match.


How many of them did you already know?

Three?

Four?

Or more?

I am sure you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these slang words to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete today’s exercise or quiz down at the bottom of this page so as to revise the entire chapter.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Let’s revise Today’s chapter.

Since you learnt some new slang words today, let's test your knowledge of slangs through this quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English

45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English 

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Definition – Phrasal Verbs

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and another word or two, usually a preposition or an adverb. They are very important in English as they help to make you sound a lot more natural when you’re speaking or be it while writing.

Natives usually don’t find it hard to use them (of course, because it’s what they have been listening to since birth), but for a non native it is definitely not a piece of cake (Click here!) to understand and use them in their spoken English.

Examples
  • Make sure you call up (Click here!) before the meeting.
  • How can you put up with this torture and not speak even a single word?

Now if you make a native read the above sentences, he/she won’t find it hard to understand what it means, while for a non native or the person who is new to learning English, won’t be able to answer or understand properly until he knows it (the meaning of these phrasal verbs) from before.

Many of you might think that non natives find it difficult because they don’t know much about their types and rules.

So I won’t even take your even single second and let’s learn about types of phrasal verbs:

TYPES OF PHRASAL VERBS

Some say there are two types of phrasal verbs while others four. It has always been a topic of discussion and different English teacher teach it depending on the sources they learnt the information from. I don’t say books or sources they learnt from are wrong, but I went through many of the English books, blogs and resources and found different answer at every place which can make a learner even more confused with the concepts and types.

So without further ado, I will explain you all the concepts you should know before learning the list of these phrasal verbs:

Phrasal verbs are basically of two types-

Intransitive phrasal verbs

Intransitive phrasal verbs are the phrasal verb that does not require a direct object.

Examples-

Many of you will comment that the second example is wrong because you see an object in it. So before you do that, lemme explain what direct object means.

A direct object is the group of words that is acted upon by the verb. And as you can see, in the second sentence “at my place yesterday” is not acted upon directly by the verb ‘drop’, so the sentence doesn’t have any direct object and the phrasal verb is intransitive ”

Transitive phrasal verbs

Transitive phrasal verbs are the phrasal verbs that have a direct object.

Examples-

Transitive phrasal verbs are of two types:

Separable phrasal verbs- The phrasal verbs in which you can put direct object in between and separate them, hence they are called separable phrasal verbs.

Examples of separable phrasal verbs

  • You can’t do the initial steps properly; you need to do it over.
  • He doesn’t want to let his mother down by failing this time.

Inseparable phrasal verbs- The phrasal verbs in which you cannot put direct object in between and separate them are called inseparable phrasal verbs.

Example of inseparable phrasal verbs

  • I ran into one of my old colleagues yesterday on a bus. (CORRECT)
  • I ran one of my old colleagues into yesterday on a bus. (WRONG)
  • He can easily get the role as the lead artist in his brother’s absence; both brothers take after their father almost 100%.(CORRECT)
  • He can easily get the role as the lead artist in his brother’s absence, both brothers take their father after almost 100%. (WRONG)

Why you should not learn from English phrasal verbs dictionary?

Ever since people start off(Click here!) their journey to learn either vocabulary or phrasal verbs, they hands down go for this option, expecting they would mug up all the vocabulary and phrasal verbs given in it and speak like a native.

Sorry to break your heart, but it will never breed the results you imagined for.

And excuse me for saying that, I definitely do not doubt your intelligence but the matter of the fact is no human is Google after all. We don’t have unlimited space in our mind to keep inputting the data and remember all.

Moreover dictionary was never made with the purpose of learning, it is just a source for referential purpose so that in case if you get stuck while reading a book, blogs and posts etc. you can refer to it for deeper and clearer understanding of the topic.

I have seen many of the non natives learning 10 words (phrasal verbs and idioms included) daily and writing them down in their separate notebook.

Is it even worth to do that?

No!!!

Not at all.

You will end up making another dictionary in your notebook after a year, moreover the words or phrasal verbs you learnt today will get vanished after a week when they are burdened with seventy new of them.

You many wanna ask now?

How to learn these phrasal verbs?

Traditional ways to mug up a list of phrasal verbs and expecting you will be able to use them in your spoken English is not a reality but a myth.

It is for this reason that even after years of learning English language at school, students cannot hold a conversation fluently. And please don’t feel bad, I never doubt your knowledge or fluency, but what I am saying is what I have been seeing for years.

In school we learnt a list of phrasal verbs, wrote down all the answers in our answer sheets but now, the fact is we hardly remember even half the list that we learnt then.

The question arises…

How to learn then?

Well, there are tons of effective methods which you can try to see which one works best for you. To quote a few of them, they are:

Method 1 :Learning in context

“According to science if you learn anything in context, it creates a link in your mind to learn and remember better.” The same goes with learning phrasal verbs or be it anything. Here, at ‘Your English Vocabulary’ we apply the same concept and teach you everything with context and examples. At first you get a short story with the use of phrasal verbs or idioms so that you can understand it well and have a link in your mind to remember it for long. Then there are some pictures which I try to pick that are relevant to the given phrasal verbs or idioms. Learning in context is something that I truly believe in and apply the same on my blog.

And I am sure you will love learning this way if you make it a habit.

Method 2 : Effective listening

It is also one of the best ways to pick up phrasal verbs in context and lemme make it clear to you, listening doesn’t mean that it has to be always an English learning blog. You can watch any YouTube video in English which is run by a native speaker depending on your personal choice and preferences. You can also subscribe to any podcast (which are usually for FREE) be it motivational, lifestyle or whatever you personal taste is, and of course this article would be incomplete if I don’t mention the power of songs. Songs are hands down one of my personal favorite which works like a magic to improve your vocabulary and fluency as well.

Method 3 : Take phrasal verbs quizzes and phrasal verbs exercises

Of course learning in context is the main meal of the learning process, but no meal is complete without a dessert. And phrasal verbs exercises or phrasal verbs quizzes are the dessert of this entire learning process. After learning the whole list of phrasal verbs in context, you should always take the quiz or exercise so as to make them permanent in your memory and use them while speaking English.

In case you if you are looking for phrasal verb quizzes, we have a new one in every blog post but if you wanna practice more, here is my personal favourite which you can check if you want Using English.

 Method 4 : Commenting (BONUS!)

After you learnt the whole list of phrasal verbs with context, examples and relevant pictures. Most of the people don’t practice, as a result, they forget most of the content and complain they can’t remember for long.

Lemme tell you, if you are honest to yourself and are committed to learn and improve, no one can stop you and you can speak like a native English speaker. But the bottom line of the process is many people lack the practice they need to put in, to learn and permanent these phrasal verbs or idioms in their mind. So please do the steps what I am about to tell you and I can promise, you will learn and remember better.

Taking phrasal verbs quizzes and exercises is one step of the process, the other one is commenting.

Now please don’t get me wrong, I am not asking for usual comments like “Informative ….”, “Please post…….”.

I want you to practice and you can practice by commenting your personal examples using the phrasal verbs or idioms in the post.

How this helps?

When you comment, it is seen by me as well as many other blog readers, so even if I could not reply in any case, your comment will be seen by other members and you can correct each other.

Simple as that.

So I encourage you all to start developing these all habits and sooner you will notice a major change in your active vocabulary which will be a home of naturally learnt phrasal verbs and idioms.

Let’s see the story in context and learn some of the phrasal verbs from the context of the story.

Read carefully…

Story in context

On 3rd of December I ran into one of my old friends Robin, on city lane bus stop. We were on cloud nine (Click here!) seeing each other after such a long time, but since I was getting late to pick up my mom from airport, asking his present address I moved on. Two days down the line I went to his place to meet him.

The scenarios have completely changed what they were before; a happy and cheerful young man was all broken down (Click here!).

After a while, I learnt that Robin was selected for a state level race competition from his school but yesterday he was riding a bike on local streets at almost 90 km/hr and suddenly a small boy came on his way and he fell from his bike after he applied the disc brakes. He suffered some serious bruises and sprains due to which he could not even stand properly.

His mother’s reaction took me aback (Click here!) when instead of consoling him at that moment, she was ranting about whatever he did.

Robin was determined to take part in the final selection race which was after a few days. As he told his mother about his decision, she completely freaked out as it could turn his wounds and sprain into some serious lifetime injuries. She completely turned down (Click here!) his decision.

“I just don’t wanna give in, try to understand mom”, said Robin to his mom.

[Keep noticing phrasal verbs]

I was so confused between both that I noticed that Robin took after his mother in many ways. I know it’s awkward but I didn’t know what to say because both of them had value in their statements and were right at their stands.

After his mother left, he told me that he doesn’t want to let his college down by not taking part in the competition. I was now prepared that I had to stand by (Click here!) him no matter what the situations are. Without a proper exercise routine and plans, we both knew it would fall through. Figuring out the most appropriate stretches and some light exercises, he started off (Click here!) his practice.

[Keep noticing phrasal verbs]

Not even half an hour was over Robin started throwing up and sat on a chair. “I am exhausted, don’t know if I will be able to make it” he said.

I could not see him like this, so I went close to him and cheered him up.

The next moment he was on back on track without breaking off (Click here!) his momentum for continuous two hours of exercise and running. Things now seemed to be working out and soon came the day of final selection.

We both reached the place where a group of  bullies said, “It’s not a one leg race buddy. Go back to your home and take rest”. Robin was kicked off but it was definitely not the time to revert back so we just moved on. The race started and Robin ran with all his force and power with adrenaline pumping through his veins and won.

The bully group who looked down on him started coming closer after he defeated them, but this was our time so we cut them out because Robin was surrounded by his well wishers and they definitely did not want to mess with the all his (Robin’s) colleagues because they were too many. Soon after that I came along (Click here!) with Robin and decided to eat out as he won.

We directly went to the shopping store and tried on some new street style clothing. Dressing up with a black leather jacket we reached the new restaurant that has it’s opening a month ago and ordered a giant pizza, two burritos and of course, some drink. Though he was advised not eat such foods and cut down on food with extra fat but it was our day, so we decided to keep away those things and enjoy.

 


45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English

Phrasal verb

Run into – meet someone unexpectedly.

phrasal verb run into

Examples

  • I ran into one of my school teacher on a restaurant today.
  • Josh was kicked off when he ran into his ex-girlfriend at the bar on Saturday.

Phrasal verb

Pick up – to receive someone from a place especially when the destinations are same.

phrasal verb pick up

Examples

  • I will pick you up for the party tomorrow.
  • It was so sweet of Joseph to pick up his girlfriend right from her door at the college farewell party.

Phrasal verb

Ranting about – complain loudly and angrily about something.

phrasal verb rant about

Examples

  • My wife is ranting about cancelling the trip we planned this weekend.
  • I don’t know why his mother keeps ranting about his son’s behavior; he is not that bad after all.

Phrasal verb

Freak out – When someone freaks out he/she suddenly gets angry about something.

phrasal verb freak out

Examples

  • His boss freaked out when he asked for a leave this Monday.
  • Michel freaks out if you talk about anything related to his ex-girlfriend.

Phrasal verb

Turn into – become (a particular type of person or thing); be transformed into.

phrasal verb turn into

Examples

  • He was like a stick in his college days; he has now turned into a muscular guy.
  • The whole auditorium has turned into a whole lot better place for everyone to visit.

Phrasal verb

Give in – to surrender or accept defeat.

phrasal verb give up

Examples

  • He gave in to the opponent when he could not persist any longer in the fight.
  • Giving in so early in the process shows that you do not have passion for the game.

Phrasal verb

Take after – resemble a parent or ancestor in looks or personality.

phrasal verb take after

Example

  • He is so extrovert and intelligent, he takes after his father in many ways.
  • Your little kid takes after you in cuteness.

Phrasal verb

Let (someone) down – Fail to support or help which was expected by others (disappoint others).

phrasal verb let down

Examples

  • I don’t wanna let my mother down by failing in any of these unit tests in February.
  • The players have let their nation down by not performing well in the final match.

Phrasal verb

Fall through – fails to happen.

phrasal verb fall through

Examples

  • Without proper plan, your business will fall through.
  • The multi-million dollar company’s model fell through because the workers and manufacturers went on a strike.

Phrasal verb

Figure out – discover, understand something.

phrasal verb figure out

Examples
  • We will have to figure out ways to deal with our company’s constant loss.
  • The doctors figured out a method with which we can reverse the damage caused to his damaged organ cells.

Phrasal verb

Throw up – to vomit.

phrasal verb throw up

Examples
  • Rickey started throwing up after eating heavy in the party.
  • Drinking 12 beers, Emma started throwing up.

Phrasal verb

Cheer (someone) up – to make a sad person feel energized and happy.

phrasal verb cheer up

Examples
  • I was trying to cheer him up after he had a break up with his longtime girlfriend.
  • Emma cheered him up when he failed miserably in his school unit tests.

Phrasal verb

Work out – have a specified or good result.

phrasal verb work out

Examples
  • We created this model for our business; I hope it works out this time.
  • There are always times in our life when things don’t seem to work out, but we should keep persisting.

Phrasal verb

Kicked off – become very angry.

phrasal verb kick off

Examples
  • He kicked off when Aaron teased him about his old jackets.
  • Josh has some problem which he seriously needs to pay heed to; he gets kicked off very often.

Phrasal verb

Look down on (someone) – regard someone with the feel of superiority.

phrasal verb look down on

Examples
  • Everyone at party looked down on a boy at the party just because he was not rich and fashionable.
  • Looking down on people just because of their physical traits is so bad.

Phrasal verb

Cut (someone) out – to disallow someone to be a part of the activity.

phrasal verb cut someone out

Examples
  • Its better you cut him out, he tells everything to his other friends.
  • I felt being cut out from the conversation yesterday at meeting.

Phrasal verb

Mess with – to bother or interfere with someone/something.

phrasal verb mess with

Examples
  • You don’t wanna mess with his elder brother; he has a giant’s biceps.
  • People are messing up with their safety by drinking and driving.

Phrasal verb

Eat out – eat at restaurant or café.

phrasal verb eat out

Examples
  • It’s been so hectic, let’s go and eat out today.
  • Eating out regularly definitely affects people’s health in many ways.

Phrasal verb

Dress up – wear nice clothes, especially for a party or function.

Examples
  • The model was dressed up in a red silky gown on the red carpet.
  • Joe was dressed up in a black suit for his wedding ceremony.

Phrasal verb

Cut down on – reduce or do less of something.

phrasal verb cut down on

Examples
  • The patient was advised to cut down on fat foods down the line.
  • I was thinking to cut down on extra sugar as I was taking excess of it.

Phrasal verb

Keep away – preventing someone from going somewhere or near something.

phrasal verb keep away

Examples
  • Medicines should be kept away from the reach of children.
  • You should keep away from the fire sources for your health and safety.

 

How many of these phrasal verbs did you already know?

There are more than 3000 like them. Don’t worry about this number—just start with a few at a time with the techniques we taught in this articles and soon you’ll be an expert and use them fluently in your spoken English.

Please don’t say that they are not forty-five, I know that they are not forty-five because the rest of them are given in these articles (down below the paragraph)  because the article was already so long.

Here is the link to all of them:

I hope you would have learned a lot about these phrasal verbs in detail, their types, how to learn and use, and much more. Make sure you learn these all phrasal verbs off by heart and practice by taking the quiz down at the bottom so as to permanent them in your mind and make them your active vocabulary.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below or email me: [email protected]

Please share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye-bye.

Can you pass today’s Phrasal verbs quiz?

Since you learnt some new phrasal verbs today, let's test your knowledge of phrasal verbs through this phrasal verbs quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!