10 Slangs words you should start using

10 Slangs words you should start using

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

How are you doing?

What!

What did you say?

Awesome!

It’s great then and I am so happy for you that you are doing great, but did you know that you used slang?

Yeah, I am talking about ‘Awesome’.

I have observed that most of the non natives don’t know what slang are, and a few who know its meaning try to avoid using it. There is a common misconception that using slang makes you bad and people often associate ‘slangs’ with ‘vulgar slangs’. Vulgar slangs are definitely something that you should hardly use but when it comes to slangs, I don’t agree when people don’t wanna use them.

There is no doubt you are a gentlemen and don’t like using bad words, so before you permanent this perception in your mind, make sure you read this article thoroughly and then assess if you were correct or not.

What are slangs?

Slang is vocabulary that is used between people who belong to the same social group and who know each other well. Slang is very informal language. It can be offending if you use them in formal situations. People often use slangs to sound less formal and be friendlier in the conversation.

When not to use slang words?

You need to extra cautious while using them in your conversation for they can be offensive, depending on the situation and person to person. You won’t say to your boss something like ‘Hey dude!’ or ‘Chill out’ for the fact your boss is not your friend. You can definitely use them with your friends but not on people like your boss, teachers or principal. So I am leaving it on you now to use them carefully in informal situations only.

Why to use slang words?

Would you like talking to your friends the way you wrote a formal application to your principal?

Or would you say something like this-

Please let know about your views and decisions at your earliest convenience. I would really grateful to you.

I will be anxiously waiting for your reply sir.

Regards,

Your name”

The answer is a big fat ‘NO’.

I guess 99.9% of you don’t speak to your friends in such a formal language.

And if you are among that 0.1%, sorry to say this article ends here for them, see you in next blog.

I guess you must be clear now with the concepts and use of slang and their meaning, so without further ado let’s see some of the most common English spoken slangs:

10 Slangs words you should start using

Slang 1

Kudos – when I first heard this slang on internet, I kinda got baffled about its meaning and use. I immediately googled it and found that it is used for showing respect. It means ‘congrats’ and if I am not wrong, this slang originated from North America.

Examples

  • Kudos to all the team members for winning the trophy.
  • Kudos Ron! You beat the fastest runner of our collage.
Slang 2

Dig – Here the slang doesn’t mean to make a hole. It is used for something you really like. Frankly speaking, I love using this slang because it sounds so cool.

Examples

  •  Hey Emma, I really dig your black leather jacket.
  •  I think you would dig the quiz down at the bottom of this article.
Slang 3

Cool- Did you notice I used it above? I know you are smart and read everything so thoroughly. Though I don’t think so that there would be a single person who doesn’t know what it means, but in case if you don’t, it means ‘great’ or ‘fantastic’.

Examples

  • I think the latest song from this pop singer was quite cool.
  • You always look so cool when you wear all denim.
Slang 4

Tight- It is used when the competitors are quite close and there is just a minor difference.

Examples

  • It was tight competition, both fighters fought till end.
  •  The competition was quite tight, nobody knew who will win the race.
Slang 5

Creep – an unpleasant person. It is a bit offensive, make sure you use it wisely.

Examples

  •  John always talks bad behind your back. He is such a creep.
  •  Robin often crosses the line when hitting on girls and comes off as a creep.
Slang 6

Buck – another term for dollar.

Examples

  • I don’t have even a buck in my pocket right now.
  •  Do you remember you have to pay me $1000 which you borrowed a week ago?
Slang 7

Beat – The word beat has many meaning in dictionary. You hear ‘a team beats the other’ which means they won, or it is used when someone hits someone like in this example -‘My uncle was beating his dog’, and in some cases it means ‘shit’. But when it comes to slang world, the meaning completely changes. It is used to say when you are ‘completely exhausted’.

Examples

  • A: Are you coming at party tonight?

B: I am beat. I don’t think so.

  •  He looks beat. He has been working out for an hour.
Slang 8

Crikey – It is used as an exclamation of surprise.

Examples

  • A: I invested all saving in that business.

B: Crikey! Did you not leave even a single buck?

Slang 9

Cram – it means to study hard and learn all in a short period of time.

Examples

  • Students often cram the entire notes just before few days from exam.
  •  He kept ignoring his studies till now, he now has to cram the entire course within a month.
Slang 10

Amped – it means you are super excited about something.

Examples

I am amped for the season finale today.

Josh was so amped for his first international match.


How many of them did you already know?

Three?

Four?

Or more?

I am sure you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these slang words to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete today’s exercise or quiz down at the bottom of this page so as to revise the entire chapter.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Let’s revise Today’s chapter.

Since you learnt some new slang words today, let's test your knowledge of slangs through this quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English

45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English 

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Definition – Phrasal Verbs

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and another word or two, usually a preposition or an adverb. They are very important in English as they help to make you sound a lot more natural when you’re speaking or be it while writing.

Natives usually don’t find it hard to use them (of course, because it’s what they have been listening to since birth), but for a non native it is definitely not a piece of cake (Click here!) to understand and use them in their spoken English.

Examples
  • Make sure you call up (Click here!) before the meeting.
  • How can you put up with this torture and not speak even a single word?

Now if you make a native read the above sentences, he/she won’t find it hard to understand what it means, while for a non native or the person who is new to learning English, won’t be able to answer or understand properly until he knows it (the meaning of these phrasal verbs) from before.

Many of you might think that non natives find it difficult because they don’t know much about their types and rules.

So I won’t even take your even single second and let’s learn about types of phrasal verbs:

TYPES OF PHRASAL VERBS

Some say there are two types of phrasal verbs while others four. It has always been a topic of discussion and different English teacher teach it depending on the sources they learnt the information from. I don’t say books or sources they learnt from are wrong, but I went through many of the English books, blogs and resources and found different answer at every place which can make a learner even more confused with the concepts and types.

So without further ado, I will explain you all the concepts you should know before learning the list of these phrasal verbs:

Phrasal verbs are basically of two types-

Intransitive phrasal verbs

Intransitive phrasal verbs are the phrasal verb that does not require a direct object.

Examples-

Many of you will comment that the second example is wrong because you see an object in it. So before you do that, lemme explain what direct object means.

A direct object is the group of words that is acted upon by the verb. And as you can see, in the second sentence “at my place yesterday” is not acted upon directly by the verb ‘drop’, so the sentence doesn’t have any direct object and the phrasal verb is instransitive ”

Transitive phrasal verbs

Transitive phrasal verbs are the phrasal verbs that have a direct object.

Examples-

Transitive phrasal verbs are of two types:

Separable phrasal verbs- The phrasal verbs in which you can put direct object in between and separate them, hence they are called separable phrasal verbs.

Examples of separable phrasal verbs

  • You can’t do the initial steps properly; you need to do it over.
  • He doesn’t want to let his mother down by failing this time.

Inseparable phrasal verbs- The phrasal verbs in which you cannot put direct object in between and separate them are called inseparable phrasal verbs.

Example of inseparable phrasal verbs

  • I ran into one of my old colleagues yesterday on a bus. (CORRECT)
  • I ran one of my old colleagues into yesterday on a bus. (WRONG)
  • He can easily get the role as the lead artist in his brother’s absence; both brothers take after their father almost 100%.(CORRECT)
  • He can easily get the role as the lead artist in his brother’s absence, both brothers take their father after almost 100%. (WRONG)

Why you should not learn from English phrasal verbs dictionary?

Ever since people start off(Click here!) their journey to learn either vocabulary or phrasal verbs, they hands down go for this option, expecting they would mug up all the vocabulary and phrasal verbs given in it and speak like a native.

Sorry to break your heart, but it will never breed the results you imagined for.

And excuse me for saying that, I definitely do not doubt your intelligence but the matter of the fact is no human is Google after all. We don’t have unlimited space in our mind to keep inputting the data and remember all.

Moreover dictionary was never made with the purpose of learning, it is just a source for referential purpose so that in case if you get stucked while reading a book, blogs and posts etc. you can refer to it for deeper and clearer understanding of the topic.

I have seen many of the non natives learning 10 words (phrasal verbs and idioms included) daily and writing them down in their separate notebook.

Is it even worth to do that?

No!!!

Not at all.

You will end up making another dictionary in your notebook after a year, moreover the words or phrasal verbs you learnt today will get vanished after a week when they are burdened with seventy new of them.

You many wanna ask now?

How to learn these phrasal verbs?

Traditional ways to mug up a list of phrasal verbs and expecting you will be able to use them in your spoken English is not a reality but a myth.

It is for this reason that even after years of learning English language at school, students cannot hold a conversation fluently. And please don’t feel bad, I never doubt your knowledge or fluency, but what I am saying is what I have been seeing for years.

In school we learnt a list of phrasal verbs, wrote down all the answers in our answer sheets but now, the fact is we hardly remember even half the list that we learnt then.

The question arises…

How to learn then?

Well, there are tons of effective methods which you can try and see which one works best for you. To quote a few of them, they are:

Method 1 :Learning in context

“According to science if you learn anything in context, it creates a link in your mind to learn and remember better.” The same goes with learning phrasal verbs or be it anything. Here, at ‘Your English Vocabulary’ we apply the same concept and teach you everything with context and examples. At first you get a short story with the use of phrasal verbs or idioms so that you can understand it well and have a link in your mind to remember it for long. Then there are some pictures which I try to pick that are relevant to the given phrasal verbs or idioms. Learning in context is something that I truly believe in and apply the same on my blog.

And I am sure you will love learning this way if you make it a habit.

Method 2 : Effective listening

It is also one of the best ways to pick up phrasal verbs in context and lemme make it clear to you, listening doesn’t mean that it has to be always an English learning blog. You can watch any YouTube video in English which is run by a native speaker depending on your personal choice and preferences. You can also subscribe to any podcast (which are usually for FREE) be it motivational, lifestyle or whatever you personal taste is, and of course this article would be incomplete if I don’t mention the power of songs. Songs are hands down one of my personal favorite which works like a magic to improve your vocabulary and fluency as well.

Method 3 : Take phrasal verbs quizzes and phrasal verbs exercises

Of course learning in context is main meal of the learning, but no meal is complete without a dessert. And phrasal verbs exercises or phrasal verbs quizzes are the dessert of this entire learning process. After learning the whole list of phrasal verbs in context, you should always take the quiz or exercise so as to make them permanent in your memory and use them while speaking English.

In case you if you are looking for phrasal verb quizzes, we have a new one in every blog post but if you wanna practice more, here is my personal favourite which you can check if you want- Using English.

 Method 4 : Commenting (BONUS!)

After you learnt the whole list of phrasal verbs with context, examples and relevant pictures. Most of the people don’t practice, as a result, they forget most of the content and complain they can’t remember for long.

Lemme tell you, if you are honest to yourself and are committed to learn and improve, no one can stop you and you can speak like a native English speaker. But the bottom line of the process is many people lack the practice they need to put in, to learn and permanent these phrasal verbs or idioms in their mind. So please do the steps what I am about to tell you and I can promise, you will learn and remember better.

Taking phrasal verbs quizzes and exercises is one step of the process, the other one is commenting.

Now please don’t get me wrong, I am not asking for usual comments like “Informative ….”, “Please post…….”.

I want you to practice and you can practice by commenting your personal examples using the phrasal verbs or idioms in the post.

How this helps?

When you comment, it is seen by me as well as many other blog readers, so even if I could not reply in any case, your comment will be seen by other members and you can correct each other.

Simple as that.

So I encourage you all to start developing these all habits and sooner you will notice a major change in your active vocabulary which will be a home of naturally learnt phrasal verbs and idioms.

Let’s see the story in context and learn some of the phrasal verbs from the context of the story.

Read carefully…

Story in context

On 3rd of December I ran into one of my old friends Robin, on city lane bus stop. We were on cloud nine (Click here!) seeing each other after such a long time, but since I was getting late to pick up my mom from airport, asking his present address I moved on. Two days down the line I went to his place to meet him.

The scenarios have completely changed what they were before; a happy and cheerful young man was all broken down (Click here!).

After a while, I learnt that Robin was selected for a state level race competition from his school but yesterday he was riding a bike on local streets at almost 90km/hr and suddenly a small boy came on his way and he fell from his bike after he applied the disk brakes. He suffered some serious bruises and sprains due to which he could not even stand properly.

His mother’s reaction took me aback (Click here!) when instead of consoling him at that moment, she was ranting about whatever he did.

Robin was determined to take part in the final selection race which was after a few days. As he told his mother about his decision, she completely freaked out as it could turn his wounds and sprain into some serious lifetime injuries. She completely turned down (Click here!) his decision.

“I just don’t wanna give in, try to understand mom”, said Robin to his mom.

[Keep noticing phrasal verbs]

I was so confused between both that I noticed that Robin took after his mother in many ways. I know it’s awkward but I didn’t know what to say because both of them had value in their statements and were right at their stands.

After his mother left, he told me that he doesn’t want to let his collage down by not taking part in the competition. I was now prepared that I had to stand by (Click here!) him no matter what the situations are. Without a proper exercise routine and plans, we both knew it would fall through. Figuring out the most appropriate stretches and some light exercises, he started off (Click here!) his practice.

[Keep noticing phrasal verbs]

Not even half an hour was over Robin started throwing up and sat on a chair. “I am exhausted, don’t know if I will be able to make it” he said.

I could not see him like this, so I went close to him and cheered him up.

The next moment he was on back on track without breaking off (Click here!) his momentum for continuous two hours of exercise and running. Things now seemed to be working out and soon came the day of final selection.

We both reached the place where a group of  bullies said, “It’s not a one leg race buddy. Go back to your home and take rest”. Robin was kicked off but it was definitely not the time to revert back so we just moved on. The race started and Robin ran with all his force and power with adrenaline pumping through his veins and won.

The bully group who looked down on him started coming closer after he defeated them, but this was our time so we cut them out because Robin was surrounded by his well wishers and they definitely did not want to mess with the all his (Robin’s) colleagues because they were too many. Soon after that I came along (Click here!) with Robin and decided to eat out as he won.

We directly went to the shopping store and tried on some new street style clothing. Dressing up with a black leather jacket we reached the new restaurant that has it’s opening a month ago and ordered a giant pizza, two burritos and of course, some drink. Though he was advised not eat such foods and cut down on food with extra fat but it was our day, so we decided to keep away those things and enjoy.

 


45 Phrasal verbs commonly used in English

Phrasal verb

Run into – meet someone unexpectedly.

phrasal verb run into

Examples

  • I ran into one of my school teacher on a restaurant today.
  • Josh was kicked off when he ran into his ex-girlfriend at the bar on Saturday.

Phrasal verb

Pick up – to receive someone from a place especially when the destinations are same.

phrasal verb pick up

Examples

  • I will pick you up for the party tomorrow.
  • It was so sweet of Joseph to pick up his girlfriend right from her door at the collage farewell party.

Phrasal verb

Ranting about – complain loudly and angrily about something.

phrasal verb rant about

Examples

  • My wife is ranting about cancelling the trip we planned this weekend.
  • I don’t know why his mother keeps ranting about his son’s behavior; he is not that bad after all.

Phrasal verb

Freak out – When someone freaks out he/she suddenly gets angry about something.

phrasal verb freak out

Examples

  • His boss freaked out when he asked for a leave this Monday.
  • Michel freaks out if you talk about anything related to his ex-girlfriend.

Phrasal verb

Turn into – become (a particular type of person or thing); be transformed into.

phrasal verb turn into

Examples

  • He was like a stick in his college days; he has now turned into a muscular guy.
  • The whole auditorium has turned into a whole lot better place for everyone to visit.

Phrasal verb

Give in – to surrender or accept defeat.

phrasal verb give up

Examples

  • He gave in to the opponent when he could not persist any longer in the fight.
  • Giving in so early in the process shows that you do not have passion for the game.

Phrasal verb

Take after – resemble a parent or ancestor in looks or personality.

phrasal verb take after

Example

  • He is so extrovert and intelligent, he takes after his father in many ways.
  • Your little kid takes after you in cuteness.

Phrasal verb

Let (someone) down – Fail to support or help which was expected by others (disappoint others).

phrasal verb let down

Examples

  • I don’t wanna let my mother down by failing in any of these unit tests in February.
  • The players have let their nation down by not performing well in the final match.

Phrasal verb

Fall through – fails to happen.

phrasal verb fall through

Examples

  • Without proper plan, your business will fall through.
  • The multi-million dollar company’s model fell through because the workers and manufacturers went on a strike.

Phrasal verb

Figure out – discover, understand something.

phrasal verb figure out

Examples
  • We will have to figure out ways to deal with our company’s constant loss.
  • The doctors figured out a method with which we can reverse the damage caused to his damaged organ cells.

Phrasal verb

Throw up – to vomit.

phrasal verb throw up

Examples
  • Rickey started throwing up after eating heavy in the party.
  • Drinking 12 beers, Emma started throwing up.

Phrasal verb

Cheer (someone) up – to make a sad person feel energized and happy.

phrasal verb cheer up

Examples
  • I was trying to cheer him up after he had a break up with his longtime girlfriend.
  • Emma cheered him up when he failed miserably in his school unit tests.

Phrasal verb

Work out – have a specified or good result.

phrasal verb work out

Examples
  • We created this model for our business; I hope it works out this time.
  • There are always times in our life when things don’t seem to work out, but we should keep persisting.

Phrasal verb

Kicked off – become very angry.

phrasal verb kick off

Examples
  • He kicked off when Aaron teased him about his old jackets.
  • Josh has some problem which he seriously needs to pay heed to; he gets kicked off very often.

Phrasal verb

Look down on (someone) – regard someone with the feel of superiority.

phrasal verb look down on

Examples
  • Everyone at party looked down on a boy at the party just because he was not rich and fashionable.
  • Looking down on people just because of their physical traits is so bad.

Phrasal verb

Cut (someone) out – to disallow someone to be a part of the activity.

phrasal verb cut someone out

Examples
  • Its better you cut him out, he tells everything to his other friends.
  • I felt being cut out from the conversation yesterday at meeting.

Phrasal verb

Mess with – to bother or interfere with someone/something.

phrasal verb mess with

Examples
  • You don’t wanna mess with his elder brother; he has a giant’s biceps.
  • People are messing up with their safety by drinking and driving.

Phrasal verb

Eat out – eat at restaurant or café.

phrasal verb eat out

Examples
  • It’s been so hectic, let’s go and eat out today.
  • Eating out regularly definitely affects people’s health in many ways.

Phrasal verb

Dress up – wear nice clothes, especially for a party or function.

Examples
  • The model was dressed up in a red silky gown on the red carpet.
  • Joe was dressed up in a black suit for his wedding ceremony.

Phrasal verb

Cut down on – reduce or do less of something.

phrasal verb cut down on

Examples
  • The patient was advised to cut down on fat foods down the line.
  • I was thinking to cut down on extra sugar as I was taking excess of it.

Phrasal verb

Keep away – preventing someone from going somewhere or near something.

phrasal verb keep away

Examples
  • Medicines should be kept away from the reach of children.
  • You should keep away from the fire sources for your health and safety.

 

How many of these phrasal verbs did you already know?

There are more than 3000 like them. Don’t worry about this number—just start with a few at a time with the techniques we taught in this articles and soon you’ll be an expert and use them fluently in your spoken English.

Please don’t say that they are not forty-five, I know that they are not forty five because the rest of them are given in these articles (down below the paragraph)  because the article was already so long.

Here is the link to all of them:

I hope you would have learnt a lot about these phrasal verbs in detail, their types, how to learn and use, and much more. Make sure you learn these all phrasal verbs off by heart and practice by taking the quiz down at the bottom so as to permanent them in your mind and make them your active vocabulary.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below or email me: [email protected]

Please share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s Phrasal verbs quiz?

Since you learnt some new phrasal verbs today, let's test your knowledge of phrasal verbs through this phrasal verbs quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Are you making these Collocation mistakes?

Are you making these Collocation mistakes?

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Well…To tell you the truth, I was about post a list of 10 useful collocations and explain them to you, but while I was shopping online today I saw a review from a non- native (I guessed it already from the name, moreover he mentioned which country he belonged to, so he was definitely a non native) and I could not help pending that article aside and writing this one.

Correcting your mistake is way more important than learning a new list of collocations. It’s always my code to live by and  I truly believe it should be the code of every English learner.

I didn’t shop though, just scoured through many other reviews on different products and many other social platforms and found these collocation mistakes which non native still make. So without beating around the bush (Click here!), let’s see some and see if you making one or more of them:

Collocation mistakes you may be making!!!
  •  I would totally recommend this product to all the users who are facing skin problems.
Explanation

I noticed many of non-natives using ‘totally recommend’ many a times in their spoken English, which is not a correct phrase to say. The right collocation which will fit in this sentence is ‘highly recommend’.

So the correct sentence would be:

  •  I would highly recommend this product to all the users who are facing skin problems.

 

  •  It was a so daring experiment to cast a young handsome actor as an old man in this TV series.
Explanation

The perfect collocation that fits this sentence would be ‘bold experiment’ which means tough and risky thing to do.

So the correct sentence would be:

  •  It was a bold experiment to cast a young handsome actor as an old man in this TV series.

 

  •  I already have so much less time. Please let me do my work, else I will be punished tomorrow.
Explanation

The collocation that would fit this sentence is “pressed for time” which means in a rush or hurry when you need to do something and you don’t have enough time.

So the correct sentence would be:

  •  I am already pressed for time. Please let me do my work, else I will be punished tomorrow.

 

  •  Aaron has a high reputation in his society because of his wealth and fame.
Explanation

Almost every second person (the non-native one) I talked with, I have noticed this phrase ‘high reputation’ being used at least once in their speech. Frankly speaking, I was once one of these non natives who used this phrase ‘high reputation’ in his spoken English. The correct phrase or collocation would be rather ‘well deserved reputation’, ‘considerable reputation’ or ‘good reputation’.

So the correct sentence would be:

  •  Aaron has a well deserved reputation in his society because of his wealth and fame.

 

  •  It is so vital to use cheese in this recipe after boiling the whole mixture.
Explanation

The collocation ‘absolutely vital’ sounds more natural and it is correct as well.

So the correct sentence would be:

  •  It is absolutely vital to use cheese in this recipe after boiling the whole mixture.

 

  •  Can you shortly describe about the main concept of this chapter?
Explanation

“Briefly describe” is the right collocation that can be used in this sentence.

So the more natural way of saying this sentence would be:

  •  Can you briefly describe about the main concept of this chapter?

 

  •  Science has disproved many normal assumptions in the past.
Explanation

Assumption often collocates with ‘safe’, ‘false’ or ‘common’. Considering the above sentence, the correct sentence would be:

  •  Science has disproved many common assumptions in the past.

 

  •  Bad family often affects the mental state of children to grow properly.
Explanation

I heard this sentence from one of my colleague who was telling me about his friends who was mentally disturbed those days. I could not understand what he meant, so I asked what he meant by the phrase ‘bad family’? He then explained to me what he really meant, the bottom line was that he wanted to say ‘dysfunctional family’ which means a family in which relationships are bad or unhealthy and people fall out (Click here!) with each other every time.

So the correct sentence would have been:

  • Dysfunctional family often affects the mental state of children to grow properly.

 

  •  We should consider all the problems and difficulty before making our next move.
Explanation

I know, I know it’s a totally correct, but in case you wanna sound more natural and confident.

The colloquial sentence would be:

  •  We should cover every eventuality (means to consider every issue or problem) before making our next move.

Hopefully you would learnt a lot from today’s article about collocation mistakes we, the non natives usually make. Let me know about your views in the comment section below or email me at:

[email protected]

Please share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Idiomatic Expressions you should start using Today!

Idiomatic Expressions you should start using Today!

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Sundar Raman, the chief executive officer of our company was all pumped up (Click here!) for the tender which our company was most likely to get. It drived him up the wall when someone from the staff spilled the beans about the last trip we had. The project was to be submitted the next day, but as the whole staff was out for a trip on this weekend, as a result no proper reports and project was ready to hand in.

Mr.Raman called up (Click here!) the whole staff for a meeting in his room.

Panic was in the air…

No one knew what to do; everyone was on the same boat and had nothing but to pass the buck and escape this complex situation.

The submission date was the next day and in case the company failed to submit the project for the tender, it would suffer the loss of millions of dollar. The work was equally distributed among all staff members. Project completion was only possible if everyone did their share.

There was no point beating around the bush now because completion of the project was hands down not a piece of cake and time was continuously running.

Zeroing in on the details and stats, the whole staff was back to their desk for the completion of the project.

 

Idiomatic Expressions and their meaning

 

Idiomatic Expression – spilled the beans

Idiomatic Expression spill the beans

Meaning – It means to reveal a secret.
Example –
  • I guess Susan was the one who spilled the beans of our plan.
  • I hate those people who can’t keep a secret and spill the beans.

Idiomatic Expression – hand in.

Idiomatic Expression hand in

Meaning – It means to submit.
Example –
  • You have to hand in these documents to the professor by tomorrow.
  • If you don’t hand in the application form by this Thursday, you won’t be able to apply for the job then.

Idiomatic Expression – in the air.

Idiomatic Expression in the air

Meaning – It means everywhere, all around.
Example –
  • There is so much fear in the air since these riots started.
  • Love is in the air, everywhere you look around.

Idiomatic Expression – on the same boat.

Idiomatic Expression in the same boat

Meaning – It means to be in the same situation.
Example –
  • Ben: “I don’t have any money right now. Can you give me $100? I will return within a week.”

Robin: “My boss fired me yesterday.”

Ben: “No problem man, I understand. We are in the same boat.”

  •  John and me are in the same boat; we both don’t know what study stream we should go in.

Idiomatic Expression – pass the buck.

Idiomatic Expression pass the buck

Meaning – It means to shift blame to the other person.
Example –
  • Don’t pass the buck now; you already have lost so much of time in falling out (Click here).
  • Chris and John have been passing bucks on each other; no one knows who has the box.

Idiomatic Expression – do one’s share.

Idiomatic Expression to do one's share

Meaning – It means to do one’s part in a group activity.
Example –
  • We can get this whole place cleaned if everyone does his/her share.
  • You should not see what others are doing rather you should do your share.

Idiomatic Expression – beat around the bush.

Idiomatic Expression beat around the bush

Meaning – It means to avoid getting to the point.
Example –
  • Stop beating around the bush and tell me what you want from me.
  • There is no point beating around the bush, you should tell them your demands and condition right away (Click here!) for approval.

Idiomatic Expression – hands down.

Idiomatic Expression hands down

Meaning – It means definitely, without a doubt.
Example –
  • Hanz de fuko is hands down one of the most trusted and reputed hair product company in the market.
  • It’s hands down an unfair judgment for the blue team in this entire tournament.

Idiomatic Expression – piece of cake.

Idiomatic Expression piece of cake

Meaning – It means something that is very easy to do.
Example –
  • Completing the whole book within a day is definitely not a piece of cake.
  • I can do 50 squats without a break. It’s a piece of cake for me.

Idiomatic Expression – Zero in on something.

Idiomatic Expression zero in on

Meaning – It means to aim or focus on something or someone.
Example –
  • The athlete was zeroed in on winning the match and he won.
  • Most of the people zero in on a goal but loose the consistency of practice.

Hopefully you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these idiomatic expressions from this English expressions list to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete the Idiomatic Expressions exercise or Idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these English expression list (I know it’s not that long, but the motive was to permanent them in your mind) and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Please share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s Idiomatic Expressions Quiz?

Since you learnt some new idiomatic expressions today, let's test your knowledge of these idioms through this Idioms Quiz

Choose the most appropriate idiomatic expression among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Phrasal verbs list- Learn with phrasal verbs quiz- 2

Phrasal verbs list- Learn with phrasal verbs quiz- 2

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Steve was all spruced up (Click here!) for the party when his mother Susan was taken aback (Click here!). She was setting up (Click here!) the room and it came across $1000 from Steve’s drawer. His mother could not take this, and called up her husband to come right away (Click here!).

He didn’t know how to face all this, but since he made a mistake, he had to bear the consequences now. After a while, his father, John came and things got even more complex when his wife told about Steve stealing $1000 for party.The situation called for a strict action to be taken, for the fact it should never take place again.

Steve has his own list of excuses saying all his friends would break off with him if he doesn’t give them party tonight. Falling out for about an hour Steve ran away  from his home.

John tried to stop him and called him up (Click here!) many a times, but he hanged up the call.

Not even an hour was over when police called them up (Click here!) and told that Steve met with an accident on the city lane.

His parents,all  nervous wreck (Click here!), reached the hospital as soon as possible. “There is nothing to worry about, he is doing okay now”, said the doctors.

Steve was out of the danger but broke a leg and suffered minor injuries with which he would get over in 25 days.

He was discharged after 7 days and came along with his parents back to home. The situations indeed called for telling him off and teaching him a serious lesson for whatever he did, but his mother and father thought better to put it off till he gets over.

Steve got the vibe that he is done after he gets well and had nothing but to regret what he did.

Phrasal verbs list- Phrasal verbs quiz

Phrasal verb

come across – to find something unexpectedly

come across

Examples –
  • I was cleaning my room when I came across your lost earrings under my desk.
  • You won’t believe that I came across a giraffe near the lane while going to school today.

Phrasal verb

call for – it means required or demanded.

call up

Examples –
  • There is a strong call for a strict action to be taken against those who invoke these riots.
  • The dish which you are preparing for your husband calls for the best quality cheese, not just creme.

Phrasal verb

Break off – to discontinue a process or friendship.

phrasal verb break off

Examples –
  • In case if you want to see the results, make sure you never break off the regularity.
  • Things were not going the way I wanted, so we thought better to break off than fighting over and again.

Phrasal verb

Fall out – To  quarrel with someone

phrasal verb fall out

Examples –
  • She used to fall out on every single issue, so they broke off their relationship.
  • John always falls out with Emma, I don’t know when will they grow up.

Phrasal verb

hang it up – to disconnect a call intentionally.

 

phrasal verb hang up

Examples –
  • I am gonna hang up if he ever calls me up down the line.
  • She hung up on me because I forgot her birthday this Saturday.

Phrasal verb

Get over – To recover

phrasal verb get over

Examples –
  • The celebrity suffered some minor injuries; he should get over with in few days.
  • You know getting over the pain of break up was not at all an easy thing to do for Adelia.

Phrasal verb

Come along – To accompany someone

phrasal verb come along

Examples –
  • I am going to Brian’s house; get ready if you wanna come along.
  • Are you not coming along with me for the farewell party?

Phrasal verb

Put something off- to procrastinate or delay something.

phrasal verb put something off

Examples –
  • Most of the people will not be able to make it to the party this weekend, so I am gonna put it off till next weekend.
  • I got the vibe that he doesn’t wanna come along because he has been continuously trying to put it off from so many days.

Phrasal verb

Tell off – It means to speak angrily to someone because they have done something wrong.

phrasal verb tell someone off

Examples –
  • My teacher told me off for being unnecessarily absent from the class for a week.
  • Robin will definitely be told off by his father today for coming this late at home.

Hopefully you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these phrasal verbs from this small phrasal verbs list to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our phrasal verbs exercise or phrasal verbs quiz down at the bottom of this page.

Let me know about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these phrasal verbs list (I know it’s not that long, but the motive was to permanent them in your mind) and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s phrasal verbs quiz?

Since you learnt some new phrasal verbs today, let's test your knowledge of phrasal verbs through this phrasal verbs quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Common mistakes non-natives make while speaking English (Updated!)

 

Common mistakes while English speaking

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

First and foremost, a very Happy New Year to all my dear readers.
“A New Year has tiptoed in.
Let’s go forward to meet it.
Let’s welcome the 365 days it brings.
Let’s live well with love in our hearts towards God and all people.
Let’s walk through its corridors with praise songs on our lips”

I know you had a blast (Click here!) partying on 31st.

And some are even partying today as well.

I am okay with whatever you are doing. After all, partying isn’t bad at all.

Have fun.

Have loads of fun but this time I would request you all to help some poor people around you or at least those who are in need. Trust me it will make your whole year full of joy and happiness and you will definitely have a skyrocketing (Click here!) career down the line.

I won’t take much of your time, so here is today’s post.

We all make mistakes and fail, it’s a part of learning process, be while speaking English or the first time you drove a bike. There is no problem if you make mistakes, the bottom line is to improve down the line (Click here!), so we never make those mistakes again.

So without further ado, let’s see some of the most common mistakes non-natives make while speaking and learn:

Collocations in Use

  •  “My grandparents grew me, I cannot even imagine a day without seeing them”, said Josh.
  • “My grandparents raised me, I cannot even imagine a day without seeing them”, said Josh.

 

  • “They are not real brothers; he is a long relative of Joseph.”
  •  “They are not real brothers; he is a distant relative of Joseph.”

 

  •  “Since he is an international cricketer now, he has to adjust with life surrounded by millions of fans.”
  • “Since he is an international cricketer now, he has to adjust to life surrounded by millions fans.”

 

  • “I don’t think Ben will be approved off in the final football trials”
  • “I don’t think Ben will be approved of in the final football trials”

 

  •  Emma arrived in my house with her mom to invite my family for the wedding ceremony.
  • Emma arrived at my house with her mom to invite my family for the wedding ceremony.

Note: We use ‘arrive at’ for a particular place. On the other hand we could have used ‘arrive in’, had it been a bigger place like country or city.

  •   “My little daughter is so afraid with these household lizards that she doesn’t even go to room alone”, said Susan.
  • “My little daughter is so afraid of these household lizards that she doesn’t even go to room alone”, said Susan.

 

  •  John is very dedicated with his football career, that he doesn’t even miss a single practice session.
  • John is very dedicated to his football career, that he doesn’t even miss a single practice session.

 

  •  The head coach consented with the team’s proposal of conducting extra practice sessions on weekends.
  • The head coach consented to the team’s proposal of conducting extra practice sessions on weekends.

Collocations in use (Updated part!)

  • As the population will increase, the unemployment will also increase.
  • Unemployment goes hand in hand with the growing population.

 

  • Before you give your final reaction I would like to tell you that it was not my mistake.
  • Before you jump to any conclusion, I would like to let you know that it wasn’t my fault.

 

  • The rumor about his affair with his co-worker was not at all accurate.
  • The rumor about his affair with his co-worker was wildly inaccurate.

 

  • I would like to give some suggestions to your brother so he can scale up his growth in his business.
  • I would like to make some suggestions to your brother so that he can scale up (Click here!) his growth in his business.

 

  • Thank you so much for setting up this event and doing these all arrangements.
  • Thank you so much for setting up (Click here!) this event and making these all arrangements.

 

  • I don’t think Joe will say any reason for his brother’s reaction to his boss.
  • I don’t think Joe will give any reason for his brother’s reaction to his boss.

 

  • The workers of his company made a strike due to less payment and no bonus.
  • The workers of his company went on a strike due to less payment and no bonus.

 

  • Though Ron earns money with which he can live, he always looks for new options to earn more.
  • Though Ron gets a living wage, he always looks for new options to earn more.

 

The sentences in red are either grammatically wrong or unnatural to say, while the sentences in green are correct and natural way to talk about a particular situation. So make sure you correct these mistakes if you are making any of them.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at : [email protected]vocabulary.com

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Business Idioms & Expression with Context and Quiz

Business Idioms & Expression with Context and Quiz 

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

Mr.Steven, the chief executive officer of one of the most trusted and reputed multinational company in Mumbai received a legal notice from the government yesterday about the growing debts of the company. He was nervous wreck (Click here!) for the fact that the company which made a killing in the whole market was now going down the drain.

A ballpark figure of loss which the company incurred in the last six months was almost $100 million”, said some of the reports by the company.

Mr.Robin, the right hand man of Steve, called up (Click here!) all the staff members and company investors for a meeting to brainstorm some ways, hoping to scale up (Click here!) the graph of growth of the company ASAP which was skyrocketing in debts and loans.

It was a no brainer that each staff member including Mr.Steven had to go an extra mile to keep the company up and running in the market. After the meeting got over, all went off to their home, but Mr.Steven went back in his office where he sat for the whole night going through all the files and documents.

He slept in his office only, wondering whether he and his members will be able to make it or the company which he has given everything to, will be lost down the line (Click here!).

Business Idioms list- with Idioms Quiz and Examples

Idiomatic Expression – Make a killing

business idioms make a killing

Meaning – To make a lot of money.

Examples

  • Jio made a killing even after giving free Internet for a whole year to all his customers.
  • Google made a killing on its launch of latest Smartphone.

Idiomatic Expression – down the drain

idiomatic expression down the drain

Meaning – destroyed or on the way to be lost or wasted.

Examples

  • No matter how hard you tried to win the match, a small mistake and everything goes down the drain.
  • The organization promised to help the poor and the needy, but now it seems to go down the drain.

Idiomatic Expression – A ballpark figure

idiomatic expression ballpark figure

Meaning – an estimated figure or amount of something.

Examples

  • I can give you a ballpark figure of what we made in the last six months, it was around $200,000.
  • A ballpark figure if I have to say, this building would be almost $25 million.

Idiomatic Expression – right hand man

idiomatic expression right hand man

Meaning – a helper or chief assistant.

Examples

  • His right hand man would be the last person you wanna ever meet.
  • I don’t know how he manages such a big multinational company without a right hand man.

Idiomatic Expression – brainstorm

idiomatic expression brainstorm

Meaning – To think about some new ideas, usually in a group to get some solution of a problem.

Examples

  • I was brainstorming if we could make some changes in the staff duty to get some positive results in the growth of the company.
  • We have to brainstorm some new ways to tackle these situations or we will have to start off (Click here!)again.

Idiomatic Expression – ASAP

idiomatic expression ASAP

Meaning – It is an acronym meaning as soon as possible.

Examples

  • We really need to take care of our environment ASAP before things get worse.
  • I really need to finish off this documentary ASAP before I get another reminder from my boss.

Idiomatic Expression – Skyrocketing

idiomatic expression skyrocket

Meaning – to increase rapidly.

Examples

  • Due to skyrocketing numbers of real time visiters, Emma upgraded her plan to premium.
  • She has seen her customers skyrocketing since she made some changes in the SEO and marketing strategies of her site.

Idiomatic Expression – No brainer

idiomatic expression no brainer

Meaning – something that is really easy and obvious.

Examples

  • It’s a no brainer that in order to achieve more, your need to work more.
  • I really don’t know why he waits for me every time to stop him from eating so much in front of others, it’s a no brainer.

Idiomatic Expression – Go an extra mile

extra mile

Meaning – to make more effort than is expected of you (usually to please someone).

Examples

  • My girlfriend often goes an extra mile for setting up (Click here!) my birthday party.
  • We really need to go an extra mile to compensate the losses we incurred till now.

Idiomatic Expression – Up and running

idiomatic expression up and running

Meaning – operating or functioning properly.

Examples

  • Though it took time, the mechanic got my washing machine up and running.
  • I can’t tell you how happy I am to see my company up and running in the whole market.

 

I am sure you would have learnt a lot from today’s business idioms article and added some of them to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our idioms exercise or idioms quiz down at the bottom of this page to practice these business idioms.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these idioms and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass this business idioms quiz?

Since you learnt some new business idioms today, let's test your knowledge of these idiomatic expressions through this Idioms Quiz

Choose the most appropriate idiomatic expression among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Phrasal verbs list- Learn with phrasal verbs quiz

Phrasal verbs list- Learn with phrasal verbs quiz

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

After celebrating the Christmas Eve with the family and friends, Josh decided to have a party with all his friends during these holidays. He went to city club for booking up the whole place for 27th December but the manager of the club turned it down saying he has some legal notices not to book it till 31st of this month.

The adrenaline which was earlier scaling up right away (Click here!) started to dilute, and Josh came back. Robin, one his close friends, could not see him like this so he called up(Click here!) all his friends and decided to set it all up at his home.

Since everyone splashed out a lot in their recent days, it was not possible for just one person to hold the entire party at home so everyone decided to chip in $100 for the party. Everything was set up and all came spruced up to the event.

Everyone had a blast.

Some were hitting on girls while others were enjoying their Vodka.

“I don’t know how to thank you enough for always standing by me. Thank you Robin, nobody cares that much for a friend”, said Josh.

Robin, being a true friend, did not want to spoil this cloud-nine (Click here!)  moment so he just subsided his emotions and appreciating his friend for the thanks he moved for the other tequila.

Phrasal verbs list-Phrasal verb Quiz

Phrasal verb- turn it down

phrasal verbs list turn down

Meaning – to refuse

Examples –

  • Maria turned the proposal of going on a date with Joe.
  • He won’t come to the party because his dad turned down to go anywhere after 10 PM.

Phrasal verb- scale up

phrasal verbs list scale up

Meaning – increasing in intensity or number.

Examples –

  • The Internet has definitely scaled up the number of opportunities for the younger generation.
  • India is one of the leading countries that are scaling up in scientific and industrial development.

Phrasal verb- set up

phrasal verbs list set up

Meaning –  to organize

Examples –

  • The school reunion was set up by the present management authority and principal.
  • We decided to set up an awareness event at the city festival this December.

Phrasal verb- splash out

phrasal verbs list splash out

Meaning – To spend a lot on something

Examples –

  • She splashed out during her anniversary that she is still paying the bills now.
  • He splashed out on a Lamborghini.

Phrasal verb- chip in

phrasal verbs list chip in

Meaning – to contribute some share as a part of a joint activity.

Examples –

  • If we all chip in few bucks, we can donate some amount to the NGOs.
  • I can only get this work done only if everyone chips in.

Phrasal verb- spruce up

phrasal verbs list spruce up

Meaning – To smarten up

Examples –

  • Joe is all spruced up for his school farewell event.
  • There was not even a single guy who was properly spruced up during this fashion fest.

Phrasal verb – hit on.

phrasal verbs list hit on

Meaning – to flirt with someone.

Examples –

  • Emma told me that Ben was hitting on her at the party last night.
  • Don’t hit on her Jimmy, she already has a boyfriend.

Phrasal verb- stand by

phrasal verbs list stand by

Meaning – to support whenever needed.

Examples –

  • I am so thankful to my girlfriend Sara for always standing by my side.
  • Rob always stood by right people; he will definitely achieve success down the line for his goodness.

Slang- had a blast

phrasal verbs list had a blast

Meaning – to have a lot of fun

Examples –

  • Everyone had a blast during the fashion fest at the city club.
  • I am sure you would have loved the place, had you accompanied with us. We literally had a blast.

Hopefully you would have learnt a lot from today’s article and added some of these phrasal verbs from this small phrasal verbs list to your English vocabulary. Make sure you complete our phrasal verbs exercise or phrasal verbs quiz down at the bottom of this page.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Improve your English vocabulary with these phrasal verbs list (I know it’s not that long, but the motive was to permanent them in your mind) and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s phrasal verbs quiz?

Since you learnt some new phrasal verbs today, let's test your knowledge of phrasal verbs through this phrasal verbs quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

Merry Christmas to you all!

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home “Your…”

Wait?

Wait?

I thought let’s break this habit today because it’s Christmas.

A very merry Christmas to you all.

I actually had to post the collocation article today but I shifted that to next Monday because I thought better to give it a break for a while and break this usual habit of posting the collocation article on Mondays. Hope you all are enjoying your day and so am I. So I didn’t wanna disturb you all but the regular blog posts because it comes only once a year, enjoy your day.

Before you just leave, lemme tell you about the recent moderation which our site has gone through.

Recently we had a small survey (I don’t know if you saw it because it was for three hours) live right here at our site. It had about 100 entries from people all around and basically it was for what could make our blog even better for each one of you.

After consideration of all submissions I personally saw each one of them and observed that most people were happy with the content and improving quite well but they complained that they are not able to practice.

Though I suggested some of the techniques which work quite well if you wanna permanent these idioms and phrases in your memory in the article: “How to learn English idioms and phrasal verbs?”, yet some people find that hard to do technique.

Since I don’t want even a single learner who doesn’t practice, I came up with the idea of a quiz after each blog (of course, wherever it is possible) and it will be there from the upcoming blog posts.

This is my Christmas present to you all. I hope you will love it.

Moreover if you would like to see how it would be, it is at last of this post Click here!.

Lemme know how it was.

Have fun, enjoy your day.

Merry Christmas once again.

Bye bye.

 

 

Phrasal verbs you should start using (Context + Quiz)

Phrasal verbs you should start using with context and quiz

Hey there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot in their English skills and want to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Context

It was a week ago when Steve was called up for a press conference in his home town for the recent award he got. Nobody thought it would happen, but the channels which were to telecast his interview and praise his achievements, criticized for using ugly statements to the reporters. Even there was a case filed against him which took everyone aback.

His personal lawyer Adam suggested him not to reply any of the outer statements or debates until the whole controversy blows over the whole internet and magazines for the fact it could increase his complications.

Steve was totally broken down by seeing the hate comments on his YouTube channel, Twitter or Facebook.

“I did not say anything bad just like this. There were some of the people who provoked me by saying rude comments about us and my family. I could not bear that, and it all drived me up the wall (Click here!) and it all happened”, said Steve to his wife Emma.

Emma being a devoted wife could not see his husband broken down like this; hence she decided to get away to Italy with her husband so that he can get some good vibes before starting off his new movie project down the line (Click here!).

Phrasal verb- call up

call up

Meaning – to phone someone.

Examples

  • Make sure you call me up before you leave for the party.
  • I was so pumped up (Click here!) for the event that I forgot to call you up and inform.

 

Phrasal verb- Take someone aback

taken aback

Meaning – To surprise someone.

Examples

  • The news of his grandfather’s death took me aback for a while.
  • The penalty in the very last seconds of the game totally took the audience aback.

 

Phrasal verb- Blow over

blow over

Meaning – When something blows over, it means it is forgotten.

Examples

  • It is better for John not to move out of his house until the whole situation blows over.
  • It is often seen in televisions these days that a heated debate blows over all the older headlines.

 

Phrasal verb- broken down

broken down

Meaning – extremely upset.

Examples

  • The lady was broken down as she heard the news of her uncle’s death in the car accident.
  • Joe broke down after his break up with Susan.

 

Phrasal verb- Get away

get away

Meaning – To go on a vacation.

Examples

  • Our team has been working so hard, so I decided to get away for a week to Hawaii.
  • It’s been almost a year when I got away to any place.

 

Phrasal verb- Start off

start off

Meaning – to begin something.

Examples

  • Make sure you have all the safety precautions before you start off the car race.
  • I was nervous wreck (Click here!) for my match in the league, but as it started off, I got confident.

 

Improve your English vocabulary with these phrasal verbs and make sure you learn them off by heart so that they become you active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at bottom if you are on mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then take care and?

Bye bye.

Can you pass today’s phrasal verbs quiz?

Since you learnt some new phrasal verbs today, let's test your knowledge of phrasal verbs through this phrasal verbs quiz.
Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!