I Know It’s Hard To Keep Your Cool

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

How are you all doing these days?

I know it’s hard to keep one’s cool when someone disappoints you with their statement and I know I am the guilty this time.

I used to say that I will help you guys learn and improve your spoken English and vocabulary but I think I failed in two months.

It’s hard to explain the number of scenarios I have been through, but long story short, there have been so many personal issues with my co-workers plus my fluctuating health was the reason I could not write for so long.

If I wanted I could have hired any local writer to keep the blog going by paying them a few bucks, but frankly speaking I just can’t trust any local writer to write articles for this website.

Bringing out the best content and value has always been my priority since day one, hence I take full responsibility for everything and I would like to apologize for such a long delay and I will try my level best to maintain the frequency of the blog as it was before.

I hope you all understand my situation and will continue to support and love this blog as you have been doing till now.

Oops!

I forgot to tell you the meaning of today’s expression ‘keep one’s cool’.

It simply means to remain calm and not get irritated or angry.

Example: It’s hard to keep my cool when someone tries to interrupt in my personal life.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

Don’t judge too quickly!

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

First and foremost, I really wanna thank all my readers for their continuous support and love you been giving to this blog.

Our blog members whom I often refer to as a ‘family’, is growing in numbers day in and out and that’s what keeps me going to do and write more.

I know some of you are a little disappointed with the decrease in frequency of blogs since the last month, but trust me my dear English learners, I try to do my best to bring out the best content for you guys which can add value to your vocabulary.

When I was a learner at beginner or intermediate level, I was a reader of many English learning websites. They were all quite good but the only downside which I used to experience after few months was that they start avoiding the main subject of the blog.

You see what I want to say is, if I write about something that has nothing to do with improving your spoken English or vocabulary, it will just go in vain in terms of adding value and make you just keep rambling around the bush. And since I want to bring out the best content, the content which genuinely adds value and improves your vocabulary, I sometimes take time.

Now I won’t deny it sometimes takes too long for a blog article to go live but the deal is, good things take a little time and I don’t want to waste your time with some topic or tips that has nothing to do improving spoken English and vocabulary.

Moreover, I am not going to lie to you, another reason why I cannot post these days is that I am continuously facing health problems from two months and it doesn’t feel like to do anything. However, if I do it deliberately, I won’t be able to bring out the best content for you all.

And I am pretty sure everyone has their own judgment and if you think it was my mistake- I am sorry.

Since there has been already so much judgment due to my absence in and out, it kind of gives me vibes why not learn to make some judgment or at least some collocations related to it.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


6 Collocation related with Judgment


1: Judge someone harshly.

Meaning: to be very critical of someone for their actions.

Example: The panel judged it too harshly this time. It was just a small mistake.

2: Pass judgment on someone.

Meaning: to criticize someone.

Example: It is better he stops passing judgment on him or he could even get beaten by his fans.

3: Lack of judgment.

Meaning: inability to judge every aspect wisely.

Example: Principal left most of the students without even knowing inside out of the situation. It clearly shows his lack of judgment to solve issues.

4: Snap judgment.

Meaning: a quick decision or opinion

Example: It is better you stop making a snap judgment against such a reputable company else they can file a case against you.

5: An error of judgment.

Meaning: a bad decision

Example: Not including the key players in the final of the tournament showed his error of judgment.

6: Withhold judgment.

Meaning: to delay a decision for a period of time.

Example: The court has withheld the decisions until every detail is clear.

 

How many of the above did you know?

One?

Or more?

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

7 ways to “Avoid answering the Questions”

How is personal life going?

Where are you planning to go this weekend?

What amount of money did you make last year?

Well… don’t worry, I am not asking you any of the personal or sensitive questions like a few above.

But I can tell you for sure you will be in situations somewhere down the line where you will want to avoid answering questions which are personal or may be sensitive.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I hope you have enough grasp of the idea what we are going to learn in today’s blog. You know what it is?

Yes, you are right.

Today we will learn about 7 different phrases you can use to avoid answering questions.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation

7 ways to avoid answering a question

 


7 ways to avoid answering a question


1: Can we talk about something else?

Explanation: I would rather use it in an informal situation such as friends, girlfriend or someone you are really close to. This expression in itself conveys to change the topic of discussion, so you expect the listener to be wise enough to understand and stop talking about the present topic or question as it might be hurting you or you might be hesitant talking about it.

Example:
A: So how long have you been together? I still can’t believe you both are breaking up.
B: Can we talk about something else?

2: It’s none of your business.

Explanation: You may use it in situations when the person is continuously bothering you by asking questions about your life that you are not comfortable to reveal. It is quite rude, so I would suggest you never use it in formal situations.

Example:
A: How much did you make last month from your investments?
B: It’s none of your business.

3: No comment!

Explanation: You would have surely heard this phrase being used by celebrities in TV interviews and press conferences many a time. It is simply a way to avoid answering in public as it can cause a controversy. People also use this when you can say something critical or negative, but you don’t wanna say it directly.

Example:
A: What’s your opinion about the present government?
B: No comment!

4: Sorry, but that’s personal.

Explanation: It’s a self-explanatory phrase which I think needs no explanation for its meaning. Using this you directly convey the one who is asking the question that you are not comfortable revealing the personal things to them.

Example:
A: What did happen yesterday? You seemed quite upset at the party.
B: Sorry, but that’s personal. By the way, everything is good now.

5: Let’s wait and see.

Explanation: You can use this when you want the other person to wait and see the answer personally rather than asking for your answer to the question.

Example:
John: Are you coming to his birthday party tonight?
Michelle: Let’s wait and see.

6: Sorry, but that’s confidential.

Explanation: There are certain business situations where you don’t have the permission to reveal the information to someone else. It is that situation where you can use this phrase to avoid answering their question.

Example:
A: Can you tell me with who is your team partnering in this contract?
B: I am sorry, but that’s confidential.

7: I am not at liberty to say anything.

Explanation: It has the same meaning as the above phrase. It is a polite way of not answering the question when you don’t have the freedom or authority to give out any information.

Example:
Will: How much are you thinking of investing in this project?
John: Sorry Will, but I am not at liberty to say anything.

 

How many of them do you use while speaking?

One?

Two?

Or more?

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Hurrah! We learned seven different phrases to avoid answering a question, so at least you won’t be avoiding regular boring phrases like “I don’t wanna tell” or anything else.

Please go through this article once again and learn all the idiomatic expressions off by heart so it becomes a part of your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

Improve Your Vocabulary- 14 ways to walk

Hey everyone out there,

I hope you are all doing well and welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

14 ways of walking- Improve Your Vocabulary


1: Swagger- to walking with a proud strut

Example: He looked the crowd for a while and swaggered along the corridor.

2: Waddle- walk with short steps and a clumsy swaying motion.

Example: He waddled down the hallway.

3: Totter- move in a feeble or unsteady way.

Example: The little baby tottered within the room.

4: Strut- to walk in a proud way trying to look important.

Example: Robin strutted around the hall to get every girls’ attention.

5: Stroll- walk in a leisurely way.

Example: I love to stroll along the beach after the sunset.

6: Stride- to walk in long steps.

Example: He strode across the road.

7: Stalk- to walk in an angry or proud way.

Example: She stalked out of the room after we questioned her.

8: Stagger- Walk or move unsteadily, as if about to fall.

Example: He entered staggering into the room.

9: Ramble- walk for pleasure in the countryside.

Example: They planned to ramble after finishing their study session.

10: Parade- a large number of people walking or in vehicles, all going in the same direction, usually as part of a public celebration of something.

Example: The students paraded through the streets during the Independence day.

11: Limp- to walk slowly and with difficulty because of having an injured or painful leg or foot.

Example: The football player limped off the ground after the serious injury in his leg.

12: Amble- to go at a slow, easy pace.

Example: We ambled around the town after a hectic day.

13: Mooch- walk or do things slowly and without much purpose.

Example: It’s better you stop mooching and do something productive.

14: Trudge- to walk, especially laboriously or wearily.

Example: We trudged through the deserted road.

Did you swagger or strut?

Or maybe you ambled someday?

Whatever may be the case, you will at least have enough vocabulary in your arsenal to differentiate what it is.

Make sure you learn these all off by heart and go through this chapter once again so it becomes a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

How to improve spoken English in 30 day?

How to improve spoken English in 30 day?

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

I receive many emails everyday where people ask me if I can help them improve their spoken English and take their English fluency to an advanced level.

The same happened yesterday while I was reading all the messages and emails, one user (who I think was new to our website) asked me if I could help him improve his spoken English in 30 days or even less.

So I am gonna be quite straightforward with my answer- It depends.

Yeah, it depends.

It depends on your present level.

Are you a beginner or on advanced level?

How much time do you spend on spoken English?

Do you even practice?

And many more.

Considering all the above points, it can be determined how much time you require to speak fluent English.

Should you go for an English course?

Well, I won’t stop you in case if you have made up your mind to opt for any English course, but I can tell you for sure form my personal experience that in case you are just beginning, you won’t improve as much you expect.

English learning is a process that requires time, effort and consistent practice. For someone who is quite new to English language and concepts, I would suggest you start with simple English learning blogs or watch videos so you have at least enough grasp of knowledge about the basic concepts of language and you don’t have to start from zero.

You should spend some time on listening for better understanding, reading for natural fluency, and spoken English for confidence while speaking.
And when you are done with all these for at least a few months, you can definitely go for any course which you like. Although you can also learn it from here, in case if you really wanna go for any course, I won’t stop you.

So you see, it depends on person to person how much time it will take for you speak fluent English. As I say, there are no shortcuts in life and the same applies while learning English, you will have to give your time and hard work for making things happen.

And it is for this reason, I try to bring quality content for you all without beating around the bush so even a learner on a basic level can get scale up their knowledge, improve, and take their spoken English to a next level.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 Most Common ‘TIME’ Collocations you should know

7 Most Common ‘TIME’ Collocations you should know

How is your time going these days?

Well, in case if things are not going that good, maybe you should take a timeout for some days and chill out with your friends.

Almost every single person has taken it to account when it came to revealing their secret juice of success. With that being said, I guess you now have a good grasp of knowledge what we are about to dive into.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today we will learn about seven different ‘TIME’ collocations you should know and start using to improve your spoken English and vocabulary.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business and use our ‘TIME’ learning some useful time collocations:


INFOGRAPHIC REPRESENTATION

Time Collocation


Collocation- About time

Meaning:  In short it means ‘finally’. It is often used for something happening now that should have been done or happened earlier.
Example: It’s about time he decided he should buy a new bike and sell the old one.

Collocation- Make time for

Meaning: It means to create time from your busy schedule of work.
Example: I need to make time this weekend for taking my kid to play.

Collocation- Go through a rough time

Meaning: To experience a lot of problems in a period of your life.
Example: Sara has been going through some tough time after her break up with Harry.

Collocation- Stall for time

Meaning- To delay or procrastinate something for later.
Example: The students were trying to stall for time so they don’t have to give any test.

Collocation- Kill time

Meaning- To do something that keeps you busy while you are waiting for something else to happen.
Example: I killed time reading the magazines while waiting for the flights at the airport.

Collocation- Spend time

Meaning- To pass time doing some activity.
Example: He is spending time surfing the web these days.

Collocation- On time

Meaning: neither early nor late, at the right time.
Example: Though there was so much traffic in the way, we managed to reach the place on time.

How many of them did you know?

One?

Three?

Or More?

I hope you would have found this article useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all collocations off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

 

10 Slang words you should start using- Part 2

Hey there,

I hope you are all doing good and welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Slangs cover almost 20 to 30 percent of native informal conversations. It is for this reason they should never be ignored in English learning process as they might void an important aspect of your informal conversation. In case you don’t know what they are and how to use them, make sure you check out the first part of this article where I talked about slangs in detail and when to use them- 10 slangs you should know.

Since they are so important, it kind of struck my mind to write the second part of it.

After all, they are so important.

So without further ado, let get down to the business and see some of the more commonly used slang in spoken English:


Infographic Representation

slang words


10 Slang words you should start using- Part 2

Slang- Blatant

Meaning: Something bad that is really obvious and intentional.

Examples:

  • The workers were suffering from a blatant discrimination of wages.
  • Everything he says is a blatant lie.

Slang- Smashing

Meaning: It is just another way of saying terrific or brilliant.

Examples:

  • We had a smashing day at Water Park today.
  • Everyone had a smashing time on his birthday party, it was so much fun!

Slang- faff around

Meaning: to spend time doing things that are not important instead of the thing that you should be doing.

Examples:

  • It’s better if you stop faffing around and so something productive.
  • If you faff around like this, you will fail again.

Slang- grub

Meaning: it is just another slang word for food.

Example:

  • I think we should get some grub before we start off the next project.
  • I am staving, let’s get some grub.

Slang- splash out

Meaning: It means to spend money freely on things that are not so necessary.

Example:

  • He splashed out $50000 on his birthday party.
  • They splashed out more than 70 thousand bucks for a little renovation of their room.

Slang- Mate

Meaning- Another term for friend, pal or buddy.

Examples:

  • I called up all my mates for a surprise party.
  • We all mates had a blast at the theater today.

Slang- cheerio

Meaning- used as an expression of good wishes on parting; goodbye.

Examples:

  • I gotta go now, see you tomorrow. Cheerio!
  • Cheerio! Have a nice weekend!

Slang- Zonked

Meaning- To be extremely tired or exhausted.

Examples:

  • All were completely zonked after the party.
  • We were all zonked after the annual fest.

Slang- Feel blue

Meaning: To feel sad or depressed.

Examples:

  • He was feeling blue after the fight.
  • You seem that are feeling blue. Is everything all right?

Slang- hang out

Meaning: To casually gather together or spend time with someone in a social manner.

Examples:

  • My brother stopped me from hanging out with those boys.
  • How about we all friends hang out this weekend?

 


How many of them were new to you?

A few?

Or all?

I hope you would have liked the second part of this slang series.

Make sure you go through this article once again and take the quiz to analyse how far you have reached in improving your informal vocabulary. I will keep updating them from time to time in case you want more, but make sure you learn these all off by heart so they become your second nature.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at: [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

Let’s practice once again!

Since you learnt some new slang words today, let's test your knowledge of these slangs through this quiz.

Choose the most appropriate phrase among the given options and submit to check how far you have reached in improving your English vocabulary. Enjoy!

7 Color Idioms you may not be knowing

7 Color Idioms you may not be knowing

Life would have been so dull and boring, had there been no colors around.

Isn’t it?

Each color has its own significance and this kind of gave a vibe, why not write about colors if they are so important in our lives.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

In today’s article of ‘7 Power Expression Series’, we will learn about color expressions that you will hear being used by natives in TV series or movies.

So without further ado, let’s get down to the business and learn seven different color expressions you should know from now on:



Idiomatic Expression

  • Out of the blue
  • Explanation: To appear or happen without warning, unexpectedly.
  • Examples:
  • He came to my friend’s party out of the blue.
  • The mob came from out of the blue and started beating people on the road.

Idiomatic Expression

  • In the black
  • Explanation: If a company or person is in the black, it means they are earning some good amount of profit, or the amount of money earned is more than the money spent.
  • Examples:
  • The company is in the black since the new staff has joined in the office.
  • Our team is in the black due to our consistent hard work and dedication.

Idiomatic Expression

  • To be green
  • Explanation: Used to describe someone who is immature, or inexperienced
  • Examples:
  • You can’t expect any fast promotion if you are green in this job.
  • He is too green to be selected for the international level.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Feel blue
  • Explanation: To feel depressed or sad.
  • Examples:
  • Emma was feeling blue because she lost her pet in an accident.
  • He has been feeling blue after he fought with his girlfriend.

Idiomatic Expression

  • A white elephant
  • Explanation: a possession that is useless, especially one that is expensive to maintain or difficult to dispose of.
  • Examples:
  • This golf kit is a white elephant for me. There are no golf courts in my town.
  • My mom gifted me a CD player on my birthday, but it is a white elephant for me. I hardly have any CD, moreover, I don’t have any interest in watching movies now.

Idiomatic Expression

  • A golden opportunity
  • Explanation: An opportunity that may never present itself again.
  • Examples:
  • He was given a golden opportunity to sing with the best pop singer of our country at a live concert.
  • Ron should not miss such a golden opportunity to play at international level.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Blue blood
  • Explanation: It is used to describe someone who is born in a royal and wealthy family.
  • Examples:
  • All the blue blood were invited to the royal wedding.
  • He is a blue blood. He owns two palaces in the main town and twenty-five luxury cars.

How many of the above idioms did you know?

Were these color idioms interesting?

I think they were.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

I hope you would have found this useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all idiomatic expressions off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 ways to say “I dislike it” in English

7 ways to say ‘I dislike it’ in English

Do you like classic movies or songs?

Well, in case if you do, you now know how you can show your liking in seven different ways which I explained in this article- 7 ways to say ‘I like it’.

But if you are on the opposite side, I mean, if you don’t like classic movies or songs, you would often use only one phrase I don’t like it’ or ‘I dislike it’.

And I don’t think it’s fair to those who want to show their dislike for something.

After all everyone should have equal options to convey their feelings in different ways. It is, for this reason, I thought why not cover seven different ways to show your dislike.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

And today we will learn seven different ways to show your dislike for someone or something. So without further ado, let get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


Idiomatic Expression

  • It isn’t my thing
  • Explanation: When someone says it isn’t their thing, it means that it is something that they don’t enjoy or interests them.
  • Examples:
  • Soccer isn’t his thing. He is hardly passionate about the game.
  • A: Do wanna take part in this dance competition?
    B: Dance isn’t my thing.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not very fond of it
  • Explanation: It simply means that you don’t like it that much how most people do.
  • Examples:
  • I am not very fond of strawberries.
  • Emma is not very fond of candlelight dinners. She likes long rides.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not a fan of
  • Explanation: You can say that you are not a fan of something when you don’t like something much or dislike it.
  • Examples:
  • He is not a fan of classical music.
  • A: Do you wanna come along at today’s concert?
    B: I am not a big fan of this pop singer.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not into it
  • Explanation: When you are not into something, it means that you don’t like it.
  • Examples:
  • She is definitely not into you. You should stop trying hit on her now.
  • I am not into golf.

Idiomatic Expression

  • It isn’t my cup of tea
  • Explanation: It means that you don’t like it or you are not interested in it.
  • Examples:
  • Sand art isn’t my cup of tea.
  • A: Are you taking part in this race competition?
    B: It’s not a cup of my tea.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I detest doing it
  • Explanation: You should only use it when you hate doing something. It is a strong phrase, so you should be cautious while using it. I would rather advise you all not to use it in formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I detest seeing him dance. He can’t even do a step properly and everybody calls him a dancer.
  • I detest when people come in without knocking the door.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I can’t stand
  • Explanation: You can use it when you dislike someone or something to an extent that you are unable to put up with it.
  • Examples:
  • I just can’t stand seeing Ron around me. He is such a show-off.
  • Robert can’t stand classical music at all.

How many of them did you already know?

One?

Two?

Or more?

I hope you would have found this useful and easy to learn. Make sure you learn these all expressions off by heart and go through this article once again so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Lemme know in the comments section below about your views and suggestions or email me at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.

 

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

7 ways to say ‘I disagree’ in English

Believe it or not, conversational phraseology plays an important part in deciding if you are a good English speaker or not. And when it comes to conversation, if you don’t know the right phraseology to express your opinions in English, you may soon draw a blank at any point in your conversation.

A conversation usually consists of starter phrases, a little discussion, agreeing and disagreeing. And when it comes to disagreeing, repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’ over and again can make your conversation monotonous and boring. It is for this fact, I thought why not add some expressions which you can use instead of repeating the same phrase ‘I disagree’.

Hey everyone out there,

Welcome back to your home ‘Your English Vocabulary’- The place for every English learner who has struggled a lot with their English skills and wants to improve their spoken English and vocabulary.

Today’s article is a part of our “7 Power Expression Series” which will cover seven different ways you can show your disagreement while conversing.
So without further ado, let’s get down to the business:


Infographic Representation


 

Idiomatic Expression

  • I beg to differ
  • Explanation: It is a polite way of disagreeing with someone else. It is hands-down the best phrase to use when it comes to formal situations.
  • Examples:
  • I beg to differ with you, but I think we should complete our projects first and then plan the conference.
  • I am sorry sir, but I beg to differ from your opinion.

Idiomatic Expression

  • No way!
  • Explanation: It is a strong phrase that you should only use in informal situations. You can use it to show a strong disagreement about something that you think is impossible to happen.
  • Examples:
  • There is no way you are gonna win this match. He is a pro wrestler.
  • A: He will definitely top in his class this year.
    B: No way!

Idiomatic Expression

  • I don’t think so.
  • Explanation: You can use this to show your slight disagreement and when you think the said statement is untrue, but you are not completely sure.
  • Examples:
  • A: Such a serious issue should be handled by the government.
  • B: Well, I don’t think so. I think common people should take their stand for the cause.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I totally disagree with that point
  • Explanation: The above phrase is quite strong, so make sure you do not use it in formal situations. It is just a way to show strong disagreement with somebody’s opinion or point.
  • Examples:
  • I totally disagree with the idea of investing in a company that hardly has any investors.
  • A: I think the government should provide free shelter and food for everyone.
    B: I totally disagree with that point. It will affect our economy if we start giving everything for free.

Idiomatic Expression

  • I am not so sure about that.
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase to show your disagreement to a point when you not so sure about the other person’s statement.
  • Examples:
  • A: He could have done better if he has taken coaching from my institute.
    B: I am not so sure about that. He is hardly passionate about learning.
  • A: They would have won the match, had they included Ron in the match.
    B: I am not so sure about that.

Idiomatic Expression

  • Not necessarily
  • Explanation: You can use this phrase when you doubt if the statement is true.
  • Examples:
  • A: He is lying for sure.
    B: Not necessarily.
  • A: I think the results would have been different, had there been no rain yesterday.
    B: Not necessarily.

Idiomatic Expression

  • That’s not always the case.
  • Explanation: You can say this expression when you want to convey that the statement said by the other person might not be always true.
  • Examples:
  • A: I think people of my society are solely responsible for this entire problem.
    B: Well, that’s not always the case. Sometimes the management doesn’t take their responsibility seriously.

I hope these expressions will add value to your active vocabulary and improve your spoken English. Make sure you go through this article once again and learn them off by heart so they become a part of your active vocabulary.

Let me about your views in the comment section below, or email us at [email protected]

Make sure you share and subscribe and show your support by liking our Facebook page (the link is somewhere on the right or at the bottom if you are on a mobile device).

Keep learning and improving your vocabulary with ‘Your English Vocabulary’.

Till then, take care and?

Bye-bye.